Day 11: Nothing suspicious in pilots’ homes

Journalists stand outside the home of Fariq Abdul Hamid, the co-pilot of the missing Malaysia Airlines plane, in Shah Alam, outside Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Sunday, March 16, 2014. Attention focused Sunday on the pilots of the missing Malaysia Airlines flight after Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak announced findings so far that suggest someone with intimate knowledge of the Boeing 777’s cockpit seized control of the plane and sent it off-course. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin)

Journalists stand outside the home of Fariq Abdul Hamid, the co-pilot of the missing Malaysia Airlines plane, in Shah Alam, outside Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Sunday, March 16, 2014. Attention focused Sunday on the pilots of the missing Malaysia Airlines flight after Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak announced findings so far that suggest someone with intimate knowledge of the Boeing 777’s cockpit seized control of the plane and sent it off-course. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin)

A search of personal computers and e-mails of the pilots aboard missing Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 turned up nothing suspicious, CNN reports.

Investigators don’t know who was controlling the 777 as it made several deviations in its scheduled flight on March 8, but nothing indicates the pilots were planning anything, the report says.

Most of the airliner’s 239 passengers were Chinese, but China says it has found no evidence that any of its citizens on board the missing plane were involved in hijacking or terrorism.

Officials now believe the plane was deliberately flown off-course, turning west and traveling back over the Malay Peninsula and out into the Indian Ocean.

The search area is now almost 3 million square miles.

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