Day 10: Plane search expands from Australia to Kazakhstan

A woman holds a heart shaped paper with messages for passengers aboard a missing Malaysia Airlines plane, as she poses for a photo during an event in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Monday, March 17, 2014. Authorities now believe someone on board the Boeing 777 shut down part of the aircraft's messaging system about the same time the plane with 239 people on board disappeared from civilian radar. But an Inmarsat satellite was able to automatically connect with a portion of the messaging system that remained in operation, similar to a phone call that just rings because no one is on the other end to pick it up and provide information. No location information was exchanged, but the satellite continued to identify the plane once an hour for four to five hours after it disappeared from radar screens. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin)

A woman holds a heart shaped paper with messages for passengers aboard a missing Malaysia Airlines plane. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin)

The Associated Press

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia —

The search for the missing Malaysian jet pushed deep into the northern and southern hemispheres Monday as Australia scoured the southern Indian Ocean and Kazakhstan — more than 10,000 kilometers (6,000 miles) to the northwest — answered Malaysia’s call for help in the unprecedented hunt.

French investigators arriving in Kuala Lumpur to lend expertise from the two-year search for an Air France jet that crashed into the Atlantic Ocean in 2009 said they were able to rely on distress signals. But that vital tool is missing in the Malaysia Airlines mystery because flight 370’s communications were deliberately severed ahead of its disappearance more than a week ago, investigators say.

“It’s very different from the Air France case. The Malaysian situation is much more difficult,” said Jean Paul Troadec, a special adviser to France’s aviation accident investigation bureau.

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