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City & State or ZIP Tonight, this weekend, May 5th...
City & State or ZIP
City & State or ZIP Tonight, this weekend, May 5th...
City & State or ZIP

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spoiler

July 29th, 2009
4:04 pm

There ’s a movie being filmed somewhere around 14th street and the playhouse. Who is filming there does anyone know

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Gina Webb

August 2nd, 2009
10:59 pm

Hi Suzanne! (and Tom) This looks like a great way to read more of the arts section online. But the “Read More About” links don’t seem to link to the full article.

I’ll check back later in hopes it gets fixed. I want to read more about the Nancy Drew photographs.

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Alex

August 4th, 2009
2:19 pm

I remember when Conroy’s last book, Beach Music, came out, there was a line wrapped twice around Oxford Books in Buckhead when he did a signing there. Sigh. I still miss Oxford Books.

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[...] Atlanta Symphony Orchestra is giving away 4,000 tickets to its last concert of the season at the Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre at Encore Park in [...]

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Janelle

August 6th, 2009
10:49 am

Box office hours are Mon to Fri Noon to 6; Sat. 10 to 2.
or visit http://www.vzwamp.com

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Richard Bagge

August 7th, 2009
2:29 am

Can’t help but wish there were more than twelve images in this series!

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hamadi rose

August 7th, 2009
11:48 am

REST IN POWER

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william cordova

August 8th, 2009
12:26 pm

balla con dioz hermano

-william

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[...] from:  ASO gives away 4000 concert tickets | Atlanta Arts and Culture Share and [...]

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[...] Charles Huntley Nelson, an artist and professor of art at Morehouse College, died on July 30, 2009. He was 39 [...]

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Henry P.Guillory(father of Gerard & Chuck Guillory)

August 12th, 2009
2:30 pm

Charles you were and will be my third son,I loved,admired and respected you for who you were and will always be in my heart.I pray for your love ones,especially your wife and boys.May God keep you in His loving ARMS ALWAYS AND FOREVER,love ya Mr.Guillory

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L. Pound

August 16th, 2009
1:04 pm

I would like to add to the list. Things Change by Lynn Hubbard. Lynn Hubbard is a local author from Hiram GA. Things Change is a fresh novel for Young Adults. I enjoyed it because there were no Vampires!

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Critic

August 18th, 2009
7:15 am

That’s art?

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Rachel Taylor (sister to Charles)

August 21st, 2009
2:32 pm

Charles, it took me a minute to come to the new reality that our family must face. I see and realize things alot different now, and can only thank god for 38 wonderful years. You worked hard and accomplished your childhood dream here on earth. I know GOD is using you for his own purposes now. I love you and miss you, Rachel

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[...] There’s a handy guide to the Atlanta International Documentary Film Festival, known as DocuFest Atlanta, and the Atlanta Underground Film Festival over at the Arts & Culture blog, “Two indie film fests light up screens around the city.” [...]

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Gigi

August 26th, 2009
8:02 pm

What a great review! I wasn’t planning on seeing this show – again – but Mr. Osborne’s review makes me think otherwise. Sounds like a fresh retelling and I’m looking forward to seeing Mr. May in action.

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SonyaD

August 29th, 2009
8:35 pm

We saw this show today and earllier in 2005. Both were amazing performances!

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The Real Patron

August 30th, 2009
11:54 am

The Alliance will have to field more shows that appeal to the entire Atlanta community to succeed.

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JackB

August 31st, 2009
9:16 am

We took our family yesterday Aug 30. We thoroughly enjoyed the performace. It was good for a laugh and a tear. Well done!

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[...] Southern Writers Last month, Atlanta Journal-Constitution blogger Suzanne Van Alten suggested ten books by southern authors that are being published this fall that you might want to consider putting on your reading list. You might also want to add the [...]

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krrromania

September 10th, 2009
4:24 pm

Click Here!

People must participate with their presence in theatres…

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lance lamont

September 10th, 2009
11:38 pm

charles was one of my best friends.we worked together,shared a studio in west end atlanta for nine years.we had great times together,we never had a disagreement.chuck was a loyal friend,talented painter,and a loving father.we were in shows together since 96.after i moved to brooklyn in 2005 i saw him, he had a show at rush arts and we had a great time i had just spoke to him 2 months before he passed.i am crushed by the lost of more than a friend ,he was my brother damn.. rest in paint chuck

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Michael

September 15th, 2009
4:51 pm

the art work seem like a rip off from David Lee’s work.

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eric

September 21st, 2009
10:51 am

did you see http://www.BREAKOUTINSONG.com? they take it to a whole new level.

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[...] Now that Gray’s book, “Hand Me My Travelin’ Shoes: In Search of Blind Willie McTell,” is out, here’s a nice story in Creative Loafing, “Retracing Blind Willie’s Blues,” and another from the AJC by Bob Townsend. [...]

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BPJ

October 22nd, 2009
1:13 pm

Why isn’t this article available on the AJC website? “Arts & Culture” doesn’t seem to be anywhere as a category. Why should this information only be available as an RSS feed?

In other words, why the HELL is the AJC so afraid of the arts?

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tsabulis

October 22nd, 2009
1:52 pm

If you go on ajc.com and click on “Blogs” you will see a link to the Arts & Culture blog.

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Harold

October 23rd, 2009
8:00 am

Cheesy beyond words… The audience snickered at every attempt they made at being scary. The only reason there was not outright laughter was embarrassment! One wonders if Theatre in the Square has not given up for the season due to construction.

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BPJ

October 23rd, 2009
9:37 am

Well, OK, it can be found, if one knows where to look. It’s still frustrating that the AJC’s arts coverage, which is frequently excellent (such as the current article on new acquisitions), is, to put it mildly, not prominent on the website.
People who are new to town, or people who have not (yet) developed a strong interest in the arts, are unlikely to ever run across these items.

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[...] AJC [...]

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Stacy

November 2nd, 2009
7:57 pm

I loved this play… it was well written, funny, and just totally enjoyable.

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DOUG

November 4th, 2009
8:50 pm

Miss LUCY BELINGER,
WANTS PPL TO GET AHOLD OF THIS SITE FOR FREE TICKETS, SO I AM TRYING TO GET HER FREE TICKETS

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Alice Murray

November 10th, 2009
12:26 pm

I agree completely that “Life in the Theatre” deserves to be six feet under. First time in years I’ve almost gone to sleep in a production, and I was there Sunday afternoon. “Come Fly with Me” soared, taking the Alliance to new heights. “Life” takes a nosedive.

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[...] The show, “Hillary Clinton Got Me Pregnant,” opened this week as part of Synchronicity Theatre’s season, and runs through Nov. 22 at 7 Stages. (You can see more clips from the show, and other work, like a Buffy tribute album, on Gogerty’s Web site, http://www.megangogerty.com. You can also read Wendell Brock’s “Hillary” review.) [...]

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To do list: November 12 | Inside Access

November 12th, 2009
11:28 am

[...] Stage: Final days for “A Life in the Theatre,” 8 p.m., Alliance Theatre, Atlanta. Review. [...]

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Ella F

November 12th, 2009
8:24 pm

Such disrespect is unbecoming. You are a blogger. Do you even have a sense of what is entailed in composing and orchestrating a full symphony of the highest order? You position it as if Mr. Marsalis is lazing about and ‘blowing his deadline’ because he is just an unorganized or undisciplined amateur. His history of accomplishment and prolific works assure us this is not the case. Sure it’s disappointing for the Atlanta Symphony but most great artists don’t create just to please the calendar, they are doing work that is coming from within- not easy. You’d do well to tone it down a bit and give a bit of respect to what Marsalis is obviously trying to accomplish- something new and not done before. Or try your hand at it yourself and see just how easy it is.

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David

November 13th, 2009
4:10 pm

Enjoyed it. Great way to spend an evening out.

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Richard Rose

November 15th, 2009
8:26 am

I was there on Saturday afternoon, November 7th. I actually did go to sleep during the production. My wife and I agreed it was the worst show of our 15 year relationship with the Alliance. Guessing by the size of the audiance (approx 20% fill), more people knew in advance how bad this how was going to be. There is always the next show.

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Doug Odum

November 16th, 2009
12:39 am

Michael Banks Sucks

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[...] Stage: “The Second City: Peach Drop, Stop and Roll,” continues, 8 p.m., Alliance Theatre, Atlanta. Review. [...]

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Maria

November 19th, 2009
2:13 pm

I wonder which performance Mr. Ruhe attended. I attended on opening night as well as the Tuesday evening performance… On Saturday evening, I was completely drawn into the story and felt that the audience around me was as well. I could feel Orfeo’s grief when he loses Euridice, and his anguish when she begs him to look at her.

Tuesday’s audience was entirely different, and never before have I noticed how an audience can affect the overall feeling of a performance. Tuesday’s audience just wasn’t easily drawn in. They appreciated the beauty of the performance, but they did not believe in it. However, I would beg to differ with Mr. Ruhe: having witnessed a performance by an enraptured audience, I believe that the director did a fine job.

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John

November 19th, 2009
8:02 pm

I also attended the opera on Tuesday night, and I wonder if Mr. Ruhe saw the same performance that I did. The laughter Mr. Ruhe refers to was limited to a very small segment of the audience, several of whom were in a boisterous mood before the opera began. I was dismayed that the reviewer made a point of noting this inappropriate audience reaction (something that is beyond the control of any artist) while discounting the importance of dance in this production. Orpheus and Eurydice featured two dancers from the Atlanta Ballet, Daniel Mayo and Rachel van Buskirk, who were onstage more often than the principal singers. To ignore their contribution, and that of choreographer Keturah Stickann, does a disservice to the production, to Mr. Ruhe’s readers, and to Mr. Ruhe himself. Finally, the enthusiasm expressed for the performers during the curtain call – all of the ensemble, and not just David Daniels – belies Mr. Ruhe’s assertion that Ms. Groag’s production failed to connect with the audience. I believe, more accurately, that her direction failed to connect with one critic, and I’m sorry for his loss.

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Pierre Ruhe

November 20th, 2009
12:39 pm

The dancers were, in fact, mentioned in the original review, although the sentence was cut for space. Here’s the mention: ” ‘Orfeo’ includes essential ballet sequences, made vital by a pair of dancers from Atlanta Ballet, Rachael Van Buskirk and Daniel Mayo.”

Also, John’s assertion that the audience’s reaction is beyond the control of the performers — “I was dismayed that the reviewer made a point of noting this inappropriate audience reaction (something that is beyond the control of any artist)” — is nonsensical. What is an audience supposed to react to? The libretto that they’ve studied at home before the show? The program notes? Tuesday evening, enough people all around me (in the balcony) chuckled at the suffering Euridice that it seemed entirely fair to question the director’s skills.
–Pierre, http://ArtsCriticATL.com

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rodly

November 20th, 2009
1:47 pm

This play was incredible. I attentionally did not research what it was about because the title (Sty of the Blind Pig) was so.. so.. “different.” Not at all what i expected, it was much more. Weedy’s (mother)character, kept the audience wrapped with her fanatical extremist religious views that she imposed on her daughter; while ironically, she was acting “un-christian” herself. (Favorite quote as she yells her adult child into submision, “Giiiirll!!! you bettuh shat up before I do you like Jesus did water!”) overall, excellent play. Grade of an A-

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anonymous

November 20th, 2009
2:21 pm

Well if I was in the balcony and saw some guy go all the way to Hell to bring back his dead wife, I’d chuckle too, but I wouldn’t let my wife see me.

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Randy Gottschalk

November 21st, 2009
9:00 am

Wow!!! Way to go Park. Hope to see you soon!

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Agreed

November 22nd, 2009
1:14 pm

It is not a nonsensical assertion: the performers can do their best to appeal to the audience, but a truly inappropriate audience reaction (ie, rowdiness or disruptiveness) is not really in the control of the performers. Yes, the audience reacts to the performers, but I believe the point John was trying to make is that not every audience behavior is a reaction to the performance.
I am surprised that Mr. Ruhe, a critic and journalist, was unable to respond to criticism without insulting others’ opinions.

And not all of the chuckling was inappropriate. What about when Orfeo, in a desperate attempt to convince Euridice to follow him, holds out his arm and demands “Wife, obey me!” The scene is heartbreaking, and I, for one, welcomed a bit of laughter.

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Disappointed

November 22nd, 2009
2:10 pm

No, but Mr. Marsalis has now failed to meet a deadline THREE times. Prolific composer or not, if he wasn’t going to be ready, he shouldn’t have agreed to the deadlines.

No one wants him to rush and submit mediocre work simply because of a deadline, but when people have already purchased tickets to an event, repeatedly letting people down is more than just disappointing.

No one is saying his job is easy … we would just have rather heard him say “I’m composing a work and I don’t know when it will be ready.” I can excuse him once, but not three times.

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Getreal

November 23rd, 2009
8:22 am

I heard this dud on Friday evening, and he should stick to playing trumpet. At least there his emotionless style is offset by his brilliant command of the instrument. This ’symphony’ is a joke, and clearly what happens when you give someone with limited composition ability a chunk of money and some cool composition software. There are many, *many* examples of good American composers of all ethnicities and genders whose work would light up the night with the ASO. As far as something new, and not done before – that may apply to Mr. Marsalis, but only to him. Maybe he should leave it to people who know their art and craft. Even though I’m not really a ‘fan’, I was actually looking forward to seeing what he came up with. And it was, in fact, a disappointment.

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George McAlpin

November 23rd, 2009
5:41 pm

Yup, here he goes again.. Mr. Pierre RUDE, SUCH little respect for the artists he thibnks he has the craft ti review, it really IS time he retired. He used to sound bitter, now he sounds bitter AND twisted…… sad really.

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George McAlpin

November 23rd, 2009
5:47 pm

I agree with “Agreed”… Mr RUDE has gotten to the stage in his “career” that like many other self appointed arbiters of taste all he can do in reply to someone who doesnt appreciate his poor reviews is to insult them,…… He’s WAY past his sell-by date and has to go! Surely the arts community in this city deserve someone better than this critic!?

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Lillian Groag

November 23rd, 2009
6:53 pm

It’s an accepted tradition in the theatre that its practioners NEVER answer a review no matter how bone-headed. However, Mahler said that tradition was the refuge of the lazy, so … here it goes.

There will always be some people that laugh inappropriately. There were some – apparently all friends of Mr. Ruhe as they seem to have been all around him – who did and … was that actually bad? It is a supremely ironic moment, that which Orfeo fears (and speaks about in great detail) actually comes to pass. It seems as if laughter of sorts (and this was discreet as well as small) wouldn’t be a bad response? I will remind Mr. Ruhe that I did not write the text, and the laughter was a reponse to the line.

Other than that, not a word for the sensational chorus? One of the best I have ever had the privilege to work with? People who sang as well as executed some very complex choreography without missing a note? Orfeo ed Euridice contains several ballets which we were not able to present but the Furies and Elysium include choreography which cannot be eluded. So the chorus did double duty: chorus and corps de ballet – this without being trained dancers. Nothing to say about that? Or the point of view of the production as an Enlightenment parable? Or the sets designed after contemporary Piranesi prints depicting his own idea of Hell?

I would have wished that Mr. Ruhe could have forgone remarks about the excellent Mr. Daniels’ new living arrangements and made a little more room to speak about the actual production and all its ideas, for or against. It seems to me that it is Mr.Ruhe who did not do his job, not me.

Thankfully the audiences have been immensely receptive with or without laughs. And … be very careful when you assign responsibility for what happens on stage. You never know.

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Great ATL Guy

November 23rd, 2009
7:10 pm

Ms. Groag sounds a little bitter, and apparently has not learned yet that the best response to something that you don’t like is no response. Where is her class and decorum? And PS, Mr. Ruhe does mention the chorus reaching the sublime and being the best in America, perhaps Ms. Groag should read the review again, and in future, for reviews that don’t set well, don’t whine…. it is quite unattractive. Suck it up Lillian, it ain’t rocket science, just Gluck.

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Lillian Groag

November 23rd, 2009
7:30 pm

Oh, dear … “unattractive”? “Class decorum”? Perish the thought. So artists are not allowed to have dialogue and anyone can print anything without expecting response? Reviewing the reviewer is an old established practice, ATL Guy. Don’t read it if you don’t like it. You dont’ swound like an uninterested party yourself.

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Jim Glare

November 30th, 2009
5:28 pm

Hey, now, aren’t we all supposed to be on the same side here?

I don’t think it makes sense here that it’s the audience being discussed rather than the production. Of course, there is no such thing as a ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ audience reaction. There are educated, uneducated, experienced and inexperienced audience members, and there is inappropriate audience behavior. (To the couple that spent half the first act of Flying Dutchman loudly messing around with plastic bags and candy wrappers directly behind me while feigning oblivion at my pointedly annoyed glares last season – I am looking at you.) But the essence of live theater of any kind is the immediacy and truth of the audience response. It can’t be “wrong,” but at the same time that doesn’t make it necessarily “right,” since by nature it’s influenced by the individual audience member and their knowledge, experience, preferences and temperament as well as what’s happening on the stage.

However, the reason we have critics is so that we can have a conversation about the performance that ideally rises above the happenstance of audience biases – most importantly the biases created by lack of knowledge and experience. In this case, reading both the review and the follow-up comments, it almost seems as though Pierre has substituted the judgment of the audience members near him for his own when it comes to the dramatic effectiveness of the third act. It would certainly make sense to mention audience reaction to substantiate his own perspective, but it doesn’t seem like that’s what’s going on here. His perspective seems to be absent. As a result, the conversation is just about the audience members that he overheard, and whether their reaction was appropriate or representative of the audience at large. These are not very interesting questions, and all the less interesting because they are impossible to answer. Who were these people? How many of them were there? Why were they laughing? We have no way to know, and this speculation misses the point.

It’s important to remember and note, as Pierre does, that this is a milestone production for the Atlanta Opera. Artistically important, with a high-caliber cast and conductor, and more significantly, reaping the rewards of years of focused effort building a truly great opera chorus (better than which in the United States, we can read above, there may or may not be), it’s one that marks the progress that the Atlanta Opera has made towards national prominence and that which this city has made artistically. Even Pierre’s review, I might note, is a sign of that progress, as he’s been in the habit of regularly eviscerating the efforts of our fine opera company for more than 10 years.

Better to focus on that, and perhaps at the same time reflect with gratitude that Pierre has been willing to engage in the discussion here, than worry too much about a few laughs and a director whose fine efforts may or may not have been unfairly maligned.

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Bill Bounds

December 1st, 2009
9:42 am

Cathy,
Great review.
Fahamu and his work continue to grow.
And this blog is a key addition to the ATL scene. It helps this now Dallas boy keep up.
Thanks,
bill

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Dane Reid

December 1st, 2009
11:48 am

Fahamu is a super talented artist and even more so, a visionary. His art is more than just paintings. They represent insight into an ingenious mind and brilliant outlook on life

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[...] Stage: Final day of “Fair Use,” 8 p.m., Actor’s Express, Atlanta. Read the review. [...]

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J

December 5th, 2009
9:05 am

So…which one is set in 1970s Warner Robbins? I sincerely want to know.

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A Cappella Books celebrates

December 5th, 2009
1:53 pm

[...] the story on Topix Posted in [...]

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Victoria Webb

December 5th, 2009
4:16 pm

Surprised that Mr. McCall doesn’t also listen to Marvin Gaye. (make me wanna holler….)
Great article, unusual premise. Artists & music is a given, but writers? That’s a new one on me.

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Gina

December 6th, 2009
10:26 am

J: Lauretta Hannon’s memoir, “The Cracker Queen,” is about growing up in Warner Robins.

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[...] an interview with Pierre Ruhe of ArtsCriticATL.com — read the entire thing on the AJC Arts & Culture blog — Stallings explains: “I spend my off hours thinking about photography and sculpture and [...]

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Eastcobb

December 11th, 2009
4:29 pm

I wonder if Geddy Lee actually stops by the store or orders online? Hmmm….

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[...] 13, 2009 by nonotes An item on the Atlanta newspaper’s arts & culture blog lists some writers sharing thoughts on music that inspires them. Georgia writer Lauretta Hanon, author of [...]

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[...] amazing power of memory last year in NYMag , we hadn't heard much from Mr. Burroughs. Now he tells a reporter for the AJC about how "hideous" his life is. Read [...]

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[...] Authors and bands celebrate 20 years at A Cappella Books | Atlanta Arts and Culture Possibly related posts: (automatically generated)ATLANTA SPRING BOOK SHOW 2009Welcome to Macon!Agent and Editor Spotlight: Cassie Murdoch, Assistant Editor at Workman Pub… [...]

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complete guitar courses review

December 16th, 2009
9:57 pm

I think i gonna see Jz and young Jeezy

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complete guitar courses review

December 16th, 2009
9:58 pm

[...] See the full article from “Atlanta Journal Constitution (blog)” [...]

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[...] Stage: “A Gift of Love: The Ultimate Love Story” opens, 8 p.m., Rialto Center for the Arts, Atlanta. Read more. [...]

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Patti Holladay

December 17th, 2009
6:10 pm

I can’t remember when I laughed harder…the show wasn’t long enough for me.I was surprised to realize I had been listening to his wonderful tales of his fantastic life for three hours. I woulda sat for another three. Mr. Crystal…THANK YOU

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sad brotha

December 18th, 2009
3:02 pm

I saw the show at the High a few years ago. The AJC crowd cheered wildly (much to my dismay) when Crystal boldly stated how his “hero” Muhammed Ali, beat the draft via the Supreme Court. Crystal, a Vietnam a draft dodger himself, needs to be reminded (and those who cheer) that for every man who shirked his duty, someone had to take his place. I don’t buy his shtick.

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Daryl-Atlanta

December 19th, 2009
5:32 am

He’s “solid ” funny, no doubt. I knew his late Aunt (Dr.) Regina, her husband and their sons since childhood, all good people. Crystal comes from “good stock. ” Glad he’s here to display his talent.

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Myron

December 19th, 2009
12:02 pm

Crystal dodged the draft…and didn’t his other hero Mickey Mantle, “the fastest man to 1st base” (also a triple crown winner) also “shirked” during the Korea War due to a “bum leg?” Looks like a pattern!

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[...] Top 20 events to while away the winter in 2010: We’ll go into detail on some of these events now, but this handy round-up from the Arts and [...]

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Ashley

December 21st, 2009
10:59 am

These paintings are not that great. The paintings are really flat and not very interesting in terms of color, which seems applied thoughtlessly over the grisaille. Grisaille’s lovely, but not when you combine it with the same flat blue, pink, orange, and green across several canvases. Everyone I’ve read fawning over this stuff seems more focused on a black artist examining blackness than the lack of decent crafting in these paintings. Is blackness an excuse in Atlanta for making sub-par paintings?

If art about blackness is what you’re interested in, go see Jabari Anderson’s work next door at Saltworks. Better painted and not all caught up in a pretense of feigned vanity.

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blackbird13

December 28th, 2009
1:07 pm

Summer Hours is my favorite of 09, so far.
Most overrated: The Hangover: a stupid, unfunny movie for permanent adolescents. Left me swearing never again…
My Oscar Prediction: Up in the Air. It’s topical and popular, has George Clooney, and a director who may be due. But I think it’s just ok, and only stands out because this has been a mostly rotten year for Hollywood movies.

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blackbird13

December 28th, 2009
1:20 pm

My pick for best movie of the decade is Junebug (2005). Though of modest scope and budget, it is the defining American movie of the of the last ten years. It has stayed with me like no other film from the period; it’s haunting without being heavy ( unlike There Will Be Blood, which you can feel struggling to achieve masterpiece status) and left me with the uneasy feeling that the red state, blue state divide might be deeper than we like to admit, as deep as the chasm that can open within one family.

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Suzanne Van Atten

December 28th, 2009
1:34 pm

Good one, blackbird13. I loved Junebug, too. Films set in the South rarely get it right, but Junebug nailed it. And Amy Adams was amazing. I’d also like to see Lost in Translation and Adaptation. on that list.

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Suzanne Van Atten

December 28th, 2009
1:59 pm

I just saw Crazy Heart over the weekend and I’m really hoping Jeff Bridges gets an Oscar nod.

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The Hangover!

December 28th, 2009
2:33 pm

Already filming the sequal

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JEAS3

December 28th, 2009
4:20 pm

I mostly agree with the list above with the caveat being that I haven’t seen all of the films. That being said, I would definitely include Lost In Translation, Pan’s Labyrinth and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon in the list IMHO.

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JEAS3

December 28th, 2009
4:51 pm

It might not be on everyone’s list but I think that WALL-E would also deserve some consideration.

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devildawg

December 28th, 2009
6:16 pm

City of God is the reason that I watch foreign films. One of the best movies I have ever seen, and the subtitles seemed to melt away after like five minutes, and I thought I knew Portuguese. I would also Iike to nominate The Dark Knight, Magnolia, and No Country for Old Men. I don’t think cinema would be the same without these movies, and I know that I wouldn’t be the same kind of movie fan without them. Gems in my book. Happy Holidays!!

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Carlosvergonza

December 28th, 2009
10:06 pm

What about Star Trek???

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Chris

December 29th, 2009
8:27 pm

were the hell is lost in translation on any of these list that film was one of the best films ever what an out rage

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jobind30

December 30th, 2009
1:56 am

Healthy samples are giving free winter samples for a limited time at http://bit.ly/5dxDmw

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Vinny

December 30th, 2009
6:48 pm

CITY OF GOD is easily my favorite film from the past decade and MEMENTO was incredible as well. The LORD OF THE RINGS was very epic!

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[...] New ideas The Top 10 Classical Music Performances list by Pierre Ruhe’s list says to me that the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra is lovely, but oh [...]

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Eric

January 1st, 2010
5:00 pm

Layer Cake. Spawned the career of Daniel Craig.

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dylandawg

January 1st, 2010
5:24 pm

children of men, pan’s labyrinth should be on there

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bigboi

January 1st, 2010
7:03 pm

I have to say “Secret Lives of Bees” has to be one of the top movies of the decade. Hands down.

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OC

January 1st, 2010
7:21 pm

This list is awful. Glad my kids didn’t go to Emory. And yes, they did qualify.

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jay

January 1st, 2010
7:24 pm

“Little Miss Sunshine” was the surprise film of the decade.
Funny and full of pathos, it should top any film of the
decade list.

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DaWg

January 1st, 2010
7:25 pm

Too many to choose from, but here’s one: The Best of Youth, Parts 1 and 2. Not that this was the best, but it was pretty good.

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Mike In Woodstock

January 1st, 2010
8:33 pm

Would have to say Star Wars Revenge of the Sith should be added to this list.

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Mr. Woodchuck

January 1st, 2010
8:39 pm

I’m shocked that Inglorious Basterds didn’t make the cut.

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BPJ

January 5th, 2010
10:14 am

Glad to see “Fair Use” on this list. I would add “The 13th of Paris” at Horizon (good script, terrific performances by Mark Kincaid and Carolyn Cook), and Theatre du Reve’s “Les Fables de LaFontaine”. (OK, my francophilia is showing).

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BPJ

January 5th, 2010
10:23 am

Yes, that Mahler 6th was the highlight of the year. And it’s worth mentioning that “Rapido was not just a composition contest; the first half was a superb concert of works by Beethoven, Gandolfi, and Higdon. The string quartet by Higdon is probably my favorite work of hers now, and I had never heard it before.

I would add the memorable concert by “Quinck” in early 2009. It was presented as part of the Musica Sacra series at First Presbyterian Church in Midtown. I get the impression Mr. Ruhe (an excellent critic) has never investigated the musical offerings there. Hint: a church doesn’t have to have “cathedral” in its name to have a first-rate music program.

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BPJ

January 5th, 2010
1:48 pm

The other omission is “Blood Knot” at Theatrical Outfit. Tom Key and Kenny Leon in an Athol Fugard classic.

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[...] Art: “A Tale of Two Cities” by artists Bryce Hammond and Maxx Morgan, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Alan Avery Art Company, Atlanta. FREE. Read more. [...]

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Alena

January 8th, 2010
11:20 pm

I recently came across your blog and have been reading along. I thought I would leave my first comment. I don’t know what to say except that I have enjoyed reading. Nice blog. I will keep visiting this blog very often.

Alena

http://onlinemariogames.net

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Dennis Andersen

January 18th, 2010
7:29 pm

Don’t you ever update these articles?
We have been reading te same old thing for weeks. Way before christmas

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NEAGU MIRCEA

January 19th, 2010
11:53 am

BUCHAREST 19 JANUARY 2010
DEAR SIR ,

MINE NAME IS : NEAGU MIRCEA – 46 YEARS , AND HER ADDREES IS :
SOS. MIHAI BRAVU NR.98-106
BLOC D.16 SC.1 ETAJ 6 AP.23
SECTOR 2
OF.POSTAL 39
COD.-021332- BUCHAREST
RUMANIEN .
YESTERDAY 18 JANUARY 2010 , I HAVE HAD , SEEN , AT TV , GOLDEN GLOBE AWARDS 2010.
WONDERFUL !
NEAGU MIRCEA – ARTIST PLASTIC AUTODIDACT – BUCHAREST .

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David

January 22nd, 2010
11:54 pm

I attended the 7pm screening at TARA and paid the full ticket price. Ray McKinnon was not there as published. Should I ask for my money back since that was the only I went? How disappointing.

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Ray

January 24th, 2010
1:34 am

Enter your comments here

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Ray

January 24th, 2010
1:41 am

Hey David, I was going to try and make it. Some personal things at the last minute prevented. I’m sorry about that. I understand why that would be bad form to announce someone is coming and they don’t show up. I hope you liked the film, at least despite the fact that Walton Goggins was in it. Perhaps I can send you a copy of THE ACCOUNTANT or CHRYSTAL to make it up somehow. Ray.

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Lost Son

January 26th, 2010
10:13 pm

When Haiti is all back together and well fed, I would love to see a relief fund for the children in America. We beat a path to every nation with a hunger pang and forget about the children right here in America with medical problems that their parents can’t afford to fix for them Or maybe the child who doesn’t have a decent meal to eat. Oh and another cause I would like to fix here in America is the care and respect of our elderly. Yep it is happening right here under our noses and no one cares.

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[...] Stage: “Good Boys and True” continues, 8 p.m., Actors Express, Atlanta. Review. [...]

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Mary

January 28th, 2010
4:17 pm

Just an FYI, this was considered a staged reading. So glad you enjoyed it though!

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Piso Mojado

January 28th, 2010
6:21 pm

What does “transmogrifies” mean?

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Susan george

January 29th, 2010
5:03 pm

Grateful for the opportunity.
How and when do we get all the details to participate?
Thank you.

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kurt

January 31st, 2010
9:53 am

Transmogrify means get a dictionary!!!! Very well written review.
It is such a pleasure to read a critic who can write and know what a “critic’s” job is!

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jumper57

January 31st, 2010
11:33 am

Wendell Brock’s got it right……great show and good time. Don’t understand lukewarm NY reviews, except that they’re New Yorkers after all.

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TheaterProfessional

February 1st, 2010
5:57 pm

Mr. Osborne clearly just does not like this kind of style of theater. It is a farce and it is FUN! I loved the show and plan on going to see it again. It is really a wonderful escape in a time when we are all a bit stressed. You just need to sit back and laugh at this show. The direction was great and show was the cast. I also have to say I love Theatre in the Square’s new look as well!
I can truly say it is one of the funniest shows I have seen in Atlanta. Go see the show! Have some fun! You are worth it and so is this show!

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Brian

February 2nd, 2010
10:15 am

The Fox is a great venue. This play sounds fun.

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Brian

February 2nd, 2010
10:20 am

Where is Little Shop of Stories? I should know, but I have forgotten.

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Suzanne Van Atten

February 2nd, 2010
10:28 am

little Shop of Stories is on East Court Square in downtown Decatur.

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[...] Stage: Theatrical Outfit’s “Brownie Points” continues, 2:30 p.m., The Balzer Theatre at Herren’s, Atlanta. Review. [...]

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jack

February 4th, 2010
12:13 pm

Weirdo, retards with an unhealthy fixation on animals.

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JATL

February 4th, 2010
12:35 pm

Perhaps PETA should look more closely into the circus -they have one of the largest elephant sanctuaries in the world in central Florida where they have an active breeding program and retirement area for Asian elephants -animals that are endangered in the wild. Elephants and other animals used to be mistreated in zoos and circuses, but almost all -at least in the western world -have caught up with the 21st century and treat the animals very well.

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jeanv

February 4th, 2010
12:46 pm

JATL – Do you homework. Elephants in circuses are kept in chains except when they are “performing”. Read up on how social and caring elephants are toward each other. If you knew the truth about elephants in zoos and circuses you would feel differently, I guarantee you.

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bobby

February 4th, 2010
1:27 pm

Elephants stink, literally.

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Pat Cuviello

February 4th, 2010
1:43 pm

JATL – The circus hasn’t changed in 140 years. The recent undercover footage from PETA shows the elephant handlers beating the elephants right before the show. The recent release of pictures and testimony of a former “elephant trainer” at Ringling’s breeding farm and training facility (which you euphemistically call a sanctuary) shows the brutality Ringling uses to “train” (BREAK) baby elephants. The abuse and brutality exposed by PETA’s video and the former “trainer’s” pictures and testimony was confirmed and admitted by Ringling during their trial testimony last year. If cruel treatment of animals is not something a person supports then that person should not attend Ringling.

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Bev

February 4th, 2010
1:58 pm

Elephants don’t belong in cramped spaces, traveling down the road!! HELLO!!

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[...] Art and Culture.. [...]

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Dave

February 4th, 2010
10:46 pm

Elephants don’t belong in the circus when there is such a need for umbrella stands.

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Audley

February 5th, 2010
2:57 am

How about a statue of PETA activists hiding the dead bodies of ‘rescued’ dogs in dumpsters? These people are hypocritical manipulators of public opinion for their own political purposes. Denounce them!

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Boogers floating in my soup

February 5th, 2010
1:36 pm

A picture of a duck and quite the ugly duck I must admit.

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Boogers floating in my soup

February 5th, 2010
1:38 pm

What about a Dung-Beetle circus. It could follow around the regular circus and clean up all of the doo doo.

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Boogers floating in my soup

February 5th, 2010
1:38 pm

A more appropriate name would be Brown-Nose Points.

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Josalin

February 5th, 2010
5:54 pm

Josalin

February 5th, 2010
6:02 pm

Hello PETA members! My name is Josalin and I’m a student journalist at Georgia State University. I am writing a story on animal mistreatment and the people who try to put an end to it. My main focus is on PETA activists who will be protesting outside the Philips Arena when the circus begins Feb. 12-14. This is a feature story for Valentine’s day and the main theme is on people who put their ethics/morals ahead of societal conventions. Please contact me if you or anyone you know will be interested in talking with me and getting your opinions known! Also, this is a Valentine’s Day piece so I am mostly looking for couples, but any information from others will be most helpful.

Thank You!
Josalin

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David

February 5th, 2010
7:39 pm

Ray. I know I was being snarky, but I am truly a fan of yours. Just before I went to the viewing of Evening Sun I had been watching Deadwood and was so impressed by your talents that I wanted to have the opportunity to meet you in person. Again, In Evening Sun you created a true, raw character in Lonzo Choat. I am geeking out because I am a “struggling actor” in Atlanta and love to see great actors at work. It was truly disappointing for you not to be there, but I understand personal things come up. The movie itself was also great, except Walton Goggins :-)

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Boogers floating in my soup

February 8th, 2010
8:31 am

PETA…A group of spoiled little attention craving Basturds.

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Jolyn deMeritte

February 8th, 2010
7:53 pm

I’m wondering if the reviewer actually saw the show. Shouldn’t a dance review be about the dancers not an ancillary piece like the orchestra? It would be nice if the AJC could employ a dance critic/reviewer with an eye toward the dancers. Afterall, this is Atlanta Ballet.

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Kathleen

February 9th, 2010
3:15 pm

Wobbly dialects, Mr. Brock? In what way? This is a play with nothing but dialects, which we took quite seriously as an element of sound design. While authenticity must sometimes be sacrificed for clarity, I beg to differ with your assessment. But then I would, wouldn’t I.

Kathleen McManus
Dialect Coach

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[...] and the Animal Protection Institute did not have legal standing to sue the circus.) There’s a statue of an elephant in Woodruff Park, which isn’t that far from Philips Arena, that protests the circus. Do you see much of that? [...]

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[...] Stage: “Brownie Points” continues, 7 p.m., The Balzer Theater at Herren’s, Atlanta. Read more. [...]

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[...] Dance: Atlanta Ballet’s “Cinderella” closes, 2 p.m., Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre, Atlanta. Read more. [...]

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Boogers floating in my soup

February 11th, 2010
12:56 pm

Get a real job Kathleen and stop sleeping nude in your bed all alone and eating your boogers.

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Bernice McFadden

February 11th, 2010
1:43 pm

Hello!

I saw that you reviewed Kathryn Stockett’s: The Help on your blog and it would be
great honor if you would read and review my novel SUGAR, which is celebrating its 10th anniversary this year.

New York Times Bestselling author Adriana Trigiani gave me a marvelous blurb after reading This Bitter Earth, which is the sequel to SUGAR:

“Bernice L. McFadden is a master storyteller.

Blogger/Book Reviewer Gerber Daisy Mom was quoted as saying this about Sugar: “In my quest to find the alternative to The Help I’m trying to immerse myself in African-American authors, whose points of view lend more authenticity and credibility to the stories of African-American characters. I hit gold with Bernice L. McFadden’s,Sugar.”

You can read her entire review here: http://gerberadaisydiaries.blogspot.com/2010/01/book-review-sugar.html

I working to place SUGAR into as many hands, hearts and minds as possible and I hope you can help me do this.

Please let me know If I may send you a copy of SUGAR. If so, please forward your address and blog URL.

Peace & Light,

Bernice

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Balletmania Midtown

February 12th, 2010
10:56 am

Ever notice that the biggest loudmouths are the ones with the lowest reading comprehension? It says “PREview” at the top Jolyn. That’s not the same as “REview”. To save money the AJC fired its culture writers so that’s why there is no dance critic/reviewer.

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g clower

February 13th, 2010
12:33 am

I loved “Sideways”, I think it was exceptional, fantastic comedy and a
statement of male maturity, or immaturity! lol

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My Boogers floating in your soup

February 16th, 2010
10:20 am

“Drama-Queen” award would be more appropriate.

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[...] Critic Catherine Fox wrote of the show: Leonardo came of age in one of the most glorious periods in western culture, when knowledge [...]

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omene sunday clinton

February 21st, 2010
2:13 pm

Dear sir,
I want to publish a drama, I just completed.
Hope to hear from you.

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Raye

February 24th, 2010
3:30 pm

I enjoyed the show enormously, and, as a working mom, identified with many of the character’s challenges. The cast was exceptionally strong – kudos to all!

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Jackson B.

February 24th, 2010
8:42 pm

You’re way off on this one. I finished reading this books a couple days ago and thought it was awesome.

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Jackson B.

February 24th, 2010
8:43 pm

Enter your comments here

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Susan

February 25th, 2010
5:27 am

I think this review is crazy, too. I read this book after USA Today recommended it for Black history month. While it could have been a bit longer, it was definitely a “gripping” read.

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[...] Dance: Modern Atlanta Dance Festival begins, 8:30 p.m., MJCCA-Zaban Park, Dunwoody. Read more. [...]

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tamara haskett

February 28th, 2010
11:57 pm

I am in Atlanta right now and wish this movie was playing, but unfortunately, it doesn’t seem to be. What’s wrong with Walton Goggins in the movie?! :P

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bigpappi

March 2nd, 2010
10:45 am

The black audience in the ATL will never get this. They are too wedded to the broad, low brow, ghetto gospel theater presented by TP and his ilk. True Colors has staged some excellent productions at SW Ats Ctr but I’m afraid Kenny is going to mis big with this multi-cultural mismash.

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Dawn Moulton

March 2nd, 2010
11:31 am

I am a black person in Atlanta and am speaking for myself. Regarding True Colors presentation of Our Town, I have two words: real deep. A few others are, “with every moment of life I am lucky to have, I want to remember the lesson I received from that presentation of Our Town.”

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Bob

March 2nd, 2010
3:43 pm

Patti Ross

March 2nd, 2010
4:40 pm

My husband, 14 year old daughter and I attended “Our Town” last weekend and thought the cast angaged the audience beautifully. It is a town with all of the lumpiness of society but it came across as an exciting adventure and covered a wealth of societal values. We loved it…and a great piece for teens.

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Barbara Pendleton

March 2nd, 2010
7:53 pm

My friend and I attended a performance of “Our Town”, last week. We both found it to be a great performance! Kenny Leon’s interpretation of
the Thornton Wilder classic, was superb. Kenny did a great job of directing. We especially liked how the actors engaged the audience into the theme of the play, throughout the performance..This was a job well done!

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Jana Jay

March 6th, 2010
12:38 am

I would have to take exception to the comment that “black audiences in the ATL won’t get it”. I just attended with a majority black audience who LOVED it! Kenny Leon has done it again, and his actors gave nuanced performances and really drew the whole audience in. The house was packed, and I think the standing ovation at the end spoke for how this black audience “got it”.

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Leslye Joy

March 7th, 2010
8:30 pm

“Our Town” was fabulous. I have to disagree with the poster who doesn’t think Black audiences will get this piece. I agree with you Jana Jay; I also attended with a majority Black audience. Maybe some folks might not get this piece, but please know that many native Blacks of Atlanta are regular theatre goers. I am one Black native Atlantan who is in the theatre about 20 times a year; I won’t speak for Atlanta transplants. “Our Town” glistened not only with the universality of its message, but it also contained some surprises–some funny, some sad. Kenny Leon has worked yet another piece of magic. True Colors Theatre continues to produce some of the best work by some of the best directors; and the Southwest Arts Center Theatre continues to be one of the most comfortable, beautiful, and convenient theatres in Atlanta.

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PLane

March 9th, 2010
3:14 pm

I Love Post Secret!!

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Phoma

March 9th, 2010
3:34 pm

Pretty neat idea, and I’m not even into art..

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Shannon

March 9th, 2010
3:36 pm

This is like the video by All American Rejects, “Dirty Little Secrets”

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Robert

March 9th, 2010
3:42 pm

The PostSecret website is updated weekly at midnight Saturdays – it’s really fun to wake up Sunday mornings and read the week’s new postcards. Glad to see that some of them are on exhibit nearby!

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malika

March 9th, 2010
4:05 pm

i checked it out and the event was really cool. i hate that kennesaw is so far outside of atlanta,(KSU ROCKA!!!) but i took a girl that i mentor to see this and she and i both really enjoyed it.

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My Secret

March 9th, 2010
4:23 pm

I don’t have a postcard, but I’ve committed several crimes and haven’t gotten caught.

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David in Snellville

March 9th, 2010
5:12 pm

My wife and I traveled from Snellville to Kennesaw to see Post Secret only to find the library closed this last Saturday (3-6-10) because they furloughed their employees to save money. Unfortunately, the art gallery where the show is is “inside” the library. And finding the library was a trip because KSU has very poor if any signage on that campus telling visitors where anything is. It took us quite a while. And having limited mobility (walk with a cane) it was a long walk from the parking lot to the library and then we found it closed. A very disappointing experience for me and the wife.

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I Have a Secret, Too

March 9th, 2010
5:21 pm

1. I know where Elvis is.
2. If I drop something on the floor, I’ll pick it up and eat it if nobody saw it fall.
3. I once left my neighbor an ugly “anonymous” note about their animals being unrestrained.

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[...] Georgia Ensemble Theatre’s “What I Did Last Summer” continues, 7:30 p.m., Roswell Cultural Arts Center, [...]

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Gatorpeach

March 10th, 2010
10:53 am

I saw this play last Wednesday evening with a predominantly Black audience, who were engaged and in the moment with this production of Wilder’s “Our Town”. I enjoyed the production immensely and will treasure the memory, especially because, three days later, my 26 year old cousin was fatally injured in a hit and run incident in southwest Georgia, early Saturday morning….I wish more young people could see this production.

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[...] Art: ‘PostSecret’ exhibition continues, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. and 7-9 p.m., Kennesaw State’s Sturgis Library art gallery, Kennesaw. FREE. Read more. [...]

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Tina

March 10th, 2010
9:55 pm

The performances on March 6 were excellent! I enjoyed the direction of Mr.Leon adding his style to the play. Life lessons are always a plus in life, and to be entertained with those lessons, you will take the memory back and use it. And, pay it forward. The multi-cultural cast was genius. The place, timeless on life, love and death. Can’t wait to see your direction on the New York Broadway stage of August Wilson’s Fences, I am sure it will be just as entertaining.

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Geno

March 11th, 2010
5:30 pm

Justin Scott Brown was truly awesome playing Georg. His Touch Me Solo was awesome…He will play Melchior for all performances Friday and Saturday…it should be a special treat…His acting and vocal skills will be worth a second trip to the Fox!!!

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Victoria Webb

March 11th, 2010
6:34 pm

I just listened to Smith’s podcast from your link. She’s very funny – ‘this book has nothing to do with Jane Austen!’

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inky

March 11th, 2010
7:07 pm

Justin Scott Brown will be performing the role of Melchior Saturday matinee and Saturday evening, and Sunday matinee and Sunday evening.

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Chris

March 15th, 2010
9:30 pm

Steve and Dennis??

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Raye

March 17th, 2010
5:24 pm

I thought this was a lovely, lyrical, moving show, one of the best I’ve seen at Aurora. It’s refreshing to see a show that explores what happens when everyone has good intentions, yet those intentions still cause crisis. There are no villians here, just people trying to do the right thing by their family. A strong production with universal (mostly!) appeal.

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Bret Carter

March 18th, 2010
7:32 pm

Harvey Fierstein is certainly a fine actor and the performace I saw last night confirmed this for me. Harvey’s wit and timing complemented his his role as Tevye. Nonetheless, if you plan to see this performace, you should read between the lines of Wendell Brock’s to appreciate that Harvey’s modesty regarding not having a ‘pretty singing voice’ is spot on. I missed having these signature songs belted out as I have in the past.
In any event, it was a fine performance by the entire cast as they did complement Harvey’s acting skills with the strength of their singing.

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Marilyn

March 22nd, 2010
2:48 pm

This was one of the best productions I’ve seen in a long time! I saw it on March 21 and was greatly impressed and moved – along with the predominately black audience. Everyone did a fantastic job. Another win for Mr. Leon, True Colors, and the Southwest Arts Center Theatre!

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Sharon Foster Jones

March 23rd, 2010
3:47 pm

“The Atlanta Exposition” is $21.99 – not $14.95 :)

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secrets » Blog Archive

March 24th, 2010
4:39 pm

[...] Yellowstone Art Museum PostSecret Exhibit. That exhibit has closed but two others are now open at Kennesaw State University (this week only) and at the American Visionary Art [...]

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J Thompson

April 2nd, 2010
3:31 pm

Loved the play!!! I cracked up the entire time and thought they all provided a fantastic performance.

Btw…your comment about the preist – “That he’s gay is nearly incidental.”??? Not so sure that was the case. Your assuming…and maybe missing a key point to the entire play.

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Jay Solomon

April 7th, 2010
10:35 am

“utterly lugubrious drama ”
“finally off-putting material ”
” a test of faith as much for the audience as for its grandiosely named characters”
“overlong and indulgent”…. ” Enough already”
” tedious sermonizing”
“The play essentially force-feeds us ”

And this was a play you liked? I’d be surprised if these parts of your “B” review will appear in T.O.s ads.

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Joe McKaughan

April 8th, 2010
5:58 pm

This is a real blow to the arts in Atlanta.

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Theresa O'Shea

April 9th, 2010
8:28 am

Jessyca and Joe have done such a wonderful and valued job. This is very sad news for the arts and, even more, for the city.

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Kevin Oakes

April 9th, 2010
9:19 am

I have been checking your pages excitedly for a review of 7 Stages’ The Day of Murders in the History of Hamlet by Bernard-Marie Koltes since its opening on April 3rd. This is an American premier that is taking place in Atlanta, but is of international interest. It would be a shame if this one of a kind event was ignored in your pages.

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Don Gray

April 14th, 2010
2:28 pm

Having just published two books, Magic and Humpy Pooper and the Still of Doom, how might I get these books reviewed? I am local (well, almost, if you count Snellville). The first book, Magic, has a science fiction premise but is mainly light drama. The second is a parody of Harry Potter set in Alabama. It’s just a not too gentle poke in fun at Harry.

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BPJ

April 14th, 2010
3:14 pm

This is terrific news! Let there be more such gifts.

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Janet

April 15th, 2010
3:55 pm

Where is the terrific photo of the Milton High School “Grease” cast that was in the paper? Why is it not online?

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Artisan

April 20th, 2010
9:04 am

It would be great if our local media would actually promote the arts in Atlanta and Georgia. THE AJC has very little arts coverage anymore. THe AJC/AccessAtlanta website is apalling. There is no easy way to find Arts and Culture on Access Atlanta. I only found this article because someone sent me a link. I would never find it by starting at the AJC/AccessAtlanta homepages. Is it under entertainment/ NO. Lifestyle? NO. Can I find an archive of local arts and culture articles and reviews? NO. It is easier to find when Brittany is in rehab than find a recent review or an art event. AJC, Please gives us and “Arts and Culture” heading on your website.

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Sally

April 20th, 2010
10:58 am

To lose the money from the National Endowment of the Arts is a crime. What our our politicians thinking. It’s a sad day for GA

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Erin

April 20th, 2010
11:33 am

Enter your comments here

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Erin

April 20th, 2010
11:34 am

Artisan, you can subscribe to local Atlanta Art News and Reviews at http://www.atlantaartcritic.com

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[...] I have some news to you: you’ll be happy to know that the Atlanta Opera will open “The Magic Flute“on [...]

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Theda Reale

April 23rd, 2010
10:40 am

I saw this at Florida Stage befor Christmas and thought it was amazing! It was well recived here and I was curious about it’s run in Atlanta…To each his own!

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Charles Hannum

April 23rd, 2010
12:19 pm

I continue to enjoy the reviews of Mr. Brock, although I regret that the paper now seems to have no full-time theatre reviewer since he evidently took the buy-out. But I read him avidly as an important part of the “what play to see” decision process.

And I must tell you I disagree with a substantial portion of his review of THE STORY TELLING ABILITY OF A BOY. And took the liberty of emailing Mr. Brock to mention the thoughts in the paragraph that begins below.

I saw the Aurora’s Story Telling Ability of a Boy a week ago and enjoyed the show. [But I have a Ph.D. in Theatre and most of my work life has been teaching and directing at the college level, so I'm naturally drawn to material dealing with young people.] I agree with comments in Mr. Brock’s review that the playwright has significant problems to overcome, including the “happy ending” tacked on at the end and not exactly inevitable. But I also think the production has important strengths overlooked in the review. Chief among them is the imagery of operatic teenage hormones rampant on the barren field of adult-society blunders represented by the teacher — a person whose raison d’être is to nourish, but who fails in that or in any other way to give life. The puppies try (sex) but never achieve fruition — surely we should see that as a metaphor for humans-in-training with the right “equipment” who simply need someone older and wiser to light the way. The playwright’s implementation is clearly clumsy in places, but the overall impact of the production as acted seems shattering (especially for parents), a necessary insight and proof again that theatre brings audiences closer to the edge of (if not into) ecstasy in the truest sense than anything else except sports and religion.

I’m also delighted to see Mr. Brock commending Aurora for its laboratory series, where experiment and research should trump most other things. Research and experiment are as vital to regional theatre as breath to life and proving grounds to car makers.

Tomorrow morning, I’ll be going through the printed paper again, looking for reviews by Mr. Brock (and Mr. Osborne) because I really do enjoy them as thoughtful and informed.

• Charles Hannum

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Marko Mitic

April 25th, 2010
3:04 pm

Toronto Art Marko Mitic Art Toronto
Toronto artist working in many mediums. Toronto art Toronto. Original Art, Digital Paintings, Photographs……

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Artisan

May 1st, 2010
9:12 am

As I understand it, the bill was an “option” that counties could use for arts funding. The state would not be creating a sale tax ‘fatigue’ because the citizens would vote on passage and individual counties could decide whether or not to implement the tax. The counties and local citizens had further control on how the tax would be used in their counties. This is a great, flexible bill. I am encouraged by the comments from our arts leaders stating this has a good chance next year.

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how much should i weigh

May 1st, 2010
10:40 am

wow sweet story man.

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whatdoiknow

May 1st, 2010
4:14 pm

I have seen Artisan’s work and taxation of those unwilling to purchase his work is the only way he can make a sale. If it is really appreciated, someone will buy it!

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Get Real

May 1st, 2010
4:31 pm

When you choose to be an artist you have to understand that you have to be actually good enough that people who like it will be willing to pay for it so you can make a living…not force others to pay you to frolic. We have a zoo…we don’t need another zoo. We have plenty of parks…although, we may need more park benches, so we all have a place to sleep after we loose our houses paying for yet another tax. What’s next…a sales tax to support baby sitters and lifeguards? Why not one to build a shelter where all the politicians that get voted out for trying to pass stuff like this can live.

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Keith

May 1st, 2010
5:06 pm

We are quickly killing the goose that laid the golden egg. We cannot continue to pile on more special sales taxes without negatively impacting retail sales. I live close enough to Alabama to make it worthwhile to go there for big purchases already.

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JRT

May 1st, 2010
5:23 pm

I want to be a philanthropist. Let’s have another tax so I can give away the tax payers money! Get good or get a real job! Earn your livin!

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Rick Cole

May 1st, 2010
6:11 pm

Government art is bad art.

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Cynthina T.

May 1st, 2010
6:12 pm

Give me a break…a special sale tax for the arts. If people want it they pay for it … a special sale tax is needed because no sane person wants to buy the junk!

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Eaton White

May 1st, 2010
6:31 pm

I was under the impression that the Conservative mantra was that fewer taxes = greater development? Business are “strained” by the “tax burden” upon them, according to the Right. This seems to be ideologically dishonest.

I also find some of these comments highly amusing. One, this refers to institutions, not purchased “art”. If you had read the article you would know this. Two, some of the greatest architectural and artistic achievements made by mankind have been, technically, “Government Art”. Once again, the RANDactionary ideology of the unwashed, uneducated tea party masses overcomes reason, sense and logic in order to rant and rave against government. Honestly, as stupid as you people are, you wouldn’t last six weeks without the GOVERNMENT keeping things running.

But again, since you all obviously missed the point while ranting about artists and government – this isn’t a sales tax on purchased art. I believe that if you buy art, you ALREADY pay sales tax. This would be a sales tax levied on admission fees (for example) to places like the High, the Alliance, etc.

However, since it’s obvious that most of you are Philistines of the highest order, I doubt you’ll ever, ever have to worry about it. Unless they add sales tax to the rodeo.

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Chris

May 1st, 2010
6:59 pm

What a crock….I guess I can toss all my unsold pizza into the trash when it doesn’t sell and send the taxpayers a bill because I suck at making pie.

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whatdoiknow

May 1st, 2010
7:48 pm

Eaton White:

The government should not be in the art business. Government taxation for arts is not the purpose of government.

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Eaton White

May 1st, 2010
11:36 pm

Which part of “ideological nonsense” did you not understand, “whatdoiknow”? Yes, that IS the position of you tea party idiots, but it is not anything OTHER than an opinion. It certainly isn’t supported by anything approaching fact or precedent.

Do you think that just because you keep saying, over and over, “Government should not be in the business” it will become something OTHER than an ideological opinion? No…it won’t.

By the way, saying “government taxation” is redundant, and make you look even more stupid.

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medicalbite

May 2nd, 2010
12:26 pm

Looking for a job? Check out http://WWW.MEDICALBITE.COM . A new National Job Search site for the Medical/ Health Industry.

Make Medicalbite.com part of your daily job search!!!!

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John

May 7th, 2010
7:01 am

Opening night was fantastic. The show was a great mixture of classical & modern ballet. The skills of the whole cast are highlighted. In my opinion, this is the best production of the Atlanta Ballet in 4 years. Great job Atlanta Ballet !!

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[...] See these articles by Jessica Blankenship at Creative Loafing and Jamie Gumbrecht at the AJC reporting events that may herald the restoration of the GCA, and keep watching this space for more [...]

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Diane

May 7th, 2010
3:42 pm

This was the most awful play I have ever seen. I would never recommend any one to go to this. I am writing the reviewer’s name down so I will know that I may not like the plays he reviews at all even if he gives them a B Plus. I went with my friend who also likes to go to plays and to be honest we left at the first intermission because it was so awful. With all of the Tony awards I was expecting a wonderful play. There is usually something at a live performance to like but honestly there was no redeeming factor in the play- not the story, music, dancing if you could call the stomping around dancing, sets, I could go on but why waste it on something useless. Never waste your time and money on this play.

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Ballet Bits « Ephemeral Archives

May 10th, 2010
12:04 pm

[...] an extensive display of archival materials at the theater.  You can read about the exhibit in this post by Howard Pousner on the Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s blog.  As reported in the article, [...]

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[...] Atlanta Botanical Gardens Atlanta Botanical Garden grows: Canopy Walk, new gardens opening Saturday | Atlanta Arts and Culture [...]

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Katie

May 24th, 2010
1:52 pm

I just saw some of this series at Phoenix Art Museum. I absolutely fell in love with it, and the concept of it is fabulous.

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Kay Citron

June 2nd, 2010
1:04 pm

As a previous “ABC Mom” and now a “GBC Mom” I cannot express how delighted I am to see the Georgia Boy Choir succeed at so many levels. The group of boys singing under the direction of Mr. White have worked so hard this year to make the choir sound good and appear professional. Mr. White’s motto has always been “Be the best boy you can be.” It is evident that this choir is formed by excellent leadership and excellent families. Their performances have far exceeded our expectations this year. Thank you for posting such a great article about the successes of the newly formed Georgia Boy Choir.

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Don M

June 2nd, 2010
2:40 pm

As a parent who’s son has performed under the direction of Mr. White I can not express just how impressed I was with the choir performances this year. The China tour was a wonderful way to end the season. My son can barely contain his excitement about going to Oxford next year.

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automobile

June 2nd, 2010
9:46 pm

I visits your site your writing style is excellent and the content is relevant. Thanks for the insight you provide the readers!

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Vicki G

June 3rd, 2010
7:23 pm

As a previous “ABC Mom” and a defector of White’s new regime, I cannot express greater dismay that this man whose hand-picked board was too intelligent to fall victim to his wiles unaminously ousted him, is getting positive publicity. He will go down in history as single-handedly ruining the institution Fletcher Wolfe brought to Atlanta, The Atlanta Boy Choir, It is beyond disressing that the ego of one can have such a significantly negative impact on an Atlanta institution.

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itkonlyyou99

June 3rd, 2010
10:09 pm

our website :[w w w .s m al l t r a d e. n e t]
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Kay Citron

June 6th, 2010
11:44 am

We have been able to link into the LIVE WEB CASTS from China and follow some of the boys’ performances while on tour across China. What a wonderful experience for the boys. The audiences have been very welcoming and appreciative of the Georgia Boy Choir in every town they have traveled to. For more information about the choir go to http://www.georgiaboychoir.org

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jenese gardner

June 8th, 2010
2:25 pm

Thanks for keeping these stories alive.

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jenese gardner

June 8th, 2010
2:26 pm

Enter your comments here

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Georgia Girl

June 11th, 2010
10:54 am

I had the pleasure of seeing the play Memorial Weekend at the Cort theater and I must say that Viola Davis’ performace left my husband and I in awe. In addition to the other actors. Denzel is already in a class by himself and the set was awesome!! Kudos to Kenny Leon, you’ve done it again. My husband and I also had the pleasure of meeting Ms. Davis, Mykelti, and the young man that played Denzel’s son Cory. They were all “down to earth” and not your traditional “hollywood” types. I can’t wait until the show travels because I want my children to see it as well.

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LizzAnn

June 17th, 2010
7:58 pm

This story was supposed to be dreary! In my opinion, all the cast did a remarkable job, including the ones who were portrayed by suits hanging up. The wind whistling in the woods was done well by the “wraiths”, and the scenery was believable. After all, this was mid-winter in Massachusetts.

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Robert Spive

June 20th, 2010
3:40 am

I also have been reading.
You are not very smart. Do something else.

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Tina Spence

June 23rd, 2010
12:32 am

Does your curator appraise art? I have an original Bebe Kemper painting which I have had for 32 years. I got it as a birthday gift when I turned 12 years old. It is signed by Bebe and I can provide photos.

If this is not something he does can you direct me to someone who can appraise It here in Atlanta.

Thank you,

Tina Spence

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Sherri Butler

June 24th, 2010
2:33 pm

I joined the High Museum quite a few years ago. This year, I raised my membership level. Year in and year out, the High Museum continues to bring rich and rewarding experiences to Atlanta and Georgia. I travel to Atlanta three or four times a year from the bottom of south Georgia – to go to the High. I’ve never been disappointed.

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Amanda

June 29th, 2010
4:43 pm

Billy (I hope, you will receive this message – at some point)
Hi, searching the web to discover a means to contact you, in order to express how much your book helped me. I recently lost job, home, everything but car and clothes, which is fine but I also lost my dogs, adopted as puppies. I was able to keep one, a beagle, for a short period of time. His name is Bailey, approx. 5yrs old. Shortly thereafter, he was attacked, received severe injuries, and could not be saved. I was heart broke. A few days later, I came across 700 Sundays. This was on a Saturday. I was very hurt, drove to the church, hoping to meet w/ preacher. Of course, no one was there. I cried for the next several hrs, sitting in my car. At this point, I began reading 700 Sunday’s. When I read the part about your grandfather (body habits), I could not stop laughing. I appreciate you, your humor, and the way you express love and kindness toward others. Anyway, the next day “City Slickers,” was on TV. Thanks for my “Do over.” God bless. I needed 700 Sunday’s.

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Artisan

July 1st, 2010
7:39 pm

Interesting. Has this been advertised to the arts community before now? I see the artists market deadline is only a week away. How would we have known about this beforehand?

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Artisan

July 1st, 2010
7:42 pm

The Performing Arts and culinary arts application deadlines were today.

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Debra Morrison

July 1st, 2010
10:53 pm

Perfect Peace is wonderful — forcing you to express all emotions; joy, sorrow, pity, laughter and understanding!

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Matt

July 3rd, 2010
9:37 pm

yes it has been advertised in various places all year long. It’s been on the Zapplication site for quite a while.

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Sharon Matthews

July 5th, 2010
9:50 pm

Dr. Black as a former student of yours, I would like to say that I expected this style of writing from you and I would like to say congrats.

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Nakata Fitch

July 8th, 2010
11:30 am

This is a wonderful and inspiring musical. Please come out to experience the Dream through powerful music and lyrics, the highest caliber of talent and in a setting where the energy is soaring each night!!!

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MM Walter

July 10th, 2010
8:30 pm

A great show! We all know the story and yet the presentation through music, dance and lyrics is moving beyond what one would expect. The cast is nimble with choreography that evokes understanding. The voices rise with intenseness and clarity. I highly recommend this production to all.

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TTHS

July 11th, 2010
9:19 am

Without fail, you must go see this show. It is by far the most powerful production I have ever had the privilege of experiencing.

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Matthew Isenburg

July 13th, 2010
1:28 am

I worked with Julian Cox on the first photo exhibit at the Getty in 1998, “The Art of the Daguerreotype”, and his enthusiasm, vision and ability to work with others made the experience one of my most cherished memories of the museum world. The High will have to search far and wide to find his equal.
Matt Isenburg

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Kem

July 17th, 2010
2:58 pm

The tribute last night was off the chain. All the acts, especially the Impressions and Eddie Levert were outstanding. Joi, Dionne and Van Hunt put it down as well.

Curtis was definitely before his time. One of the underrated classics was “Back to the World” which if I am not mistaken was the follow-up to “Superfly.

The orchestra led by Russell Gunn was tight also. And the female dancers………Damn!

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George Spelvin

July 20th, 2010
9:38 am

It is a bit hard to understand why ”the rights to produce the musical were rescinded”. “Grease,” toured the Fox last year. It would be rare for a revival of an old musical to make another round in ATL this year. On top of that several area High Schools produced the musical without rights problems. The rights owner and theatres negotiate a production months in advance. If there is any question of a larger, more profitable, production in the same area, the rights owner usually says no to a smaller theatre. It is hard to imagine that the rights owner would not allow a local production after a big, one time tour. It is rare to pull rights after an agreement is made, unless perhaps, up front royalties and fees were not paid to the rights owner.

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Theater Watcher

July 20th, 2010
11:30 am

@ George Spelvin. As far as understand it, the rights were pulled because that tour was still ongoing… even though the show was I think in Boston at the time. Perhaps they had plans to bring the show to neighboring southern state, perhaps the recent big screen movie revival had something to do with it,IDK.

Also, rarely does a HS production of anything get shut down… too low under legal radar, and bad press besides.

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George Spelvin

July 20th, 2010
12:45 pm

@Theatre Watcher. Thanks for the info. It does seem odd that the rights were pulled when the show was in tech week. I can’t imagine GET investing that much in rehearsal, sets, costumes, music, etc. knowing that the rights could be pulled at the last minute. I hope they can recoup something from the rights holder.

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D Anne

July 21st, 2010
11:03 pm

This is a Broadway-calibre show and I loved it! The singers all have beautiful voices and the song lyrics are powerful. You should see it!

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Tim McClure

August 4th, 2010
5:50 pm

Congratulations!!! Represent ATL well in your future endeavors!

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Barbara Garrison

August 9th, 2010
3:05 pm

I vote for Joseph Brewer. He is a very fine young man and his talent overflows.

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George Spelvin

August 11th, 2010
1:14 pm

Paging GA Shakes: Think “Globe-ally”, spend locally.

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Carmella Lammers

August 11th, 2010
11:33 pm

I vote for Christina Lewis – she is an exceptional vocalist -this recording does not do her justice. Beautiful individual and talented!

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vera warnke

August 11th, 2010
11:33 pm

Christina Lewis is WONDERFUL!! My vote is solid for Christina all the way!! Have you heard her yet = amazing!!!!!

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Laura Wagner

August 12th, 2010
3:31 pm

Definately we know the great talent Christina Lewis has!! She is such an outstanding singer.
Way to go Chris….always knew you were our number one vote for amazing singer! Our favorite “Dorothy”!

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Sharon Nussbaum

August 12th, 2010
6:36 pm

By far…..Christina Lewis has GOT to win! Her voice is absolutely tops!
What an amazing, personality she has along with such a phenomenal voice. This tape is great, but to hear her in person…WOW!
Good Luck Chris!

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Valeta Beining

August 12th, 2010
7:59 pm

My vote goes to Christina Lewis, I have enjoyed listening to your beautiful voice since you were a little girl!
I have enjoyed attending all of your class plays, competitions/events over the years, My Love and Best wishes to YOU!

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Pam Schnipke

August 12th, 2010
10:51 pm

I vote for Christina Lewis. I have heard her sing on several occations and she is just fantastic. A beautiful young woman and a talented singer.

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Jane Strayer

August 13th, 2010
8:03 am

Christina Lewis is by far the BEST!!!! She is a talented and composed vocal artist. She has the voice you want to hear more of each time you hear her sing. My vote goes to Christina – for sure! Good Luck Chris, you deserve a win.

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Kathy Lewis

August 13th, 2010
9:46 pm

Chrissy has my vote all the way! To hear her is to love her. Love ya and best wishes!

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Cheryl Ehnle

August 14th, 2010
9:19 pm

Enter your comments hereChrissy you’re as awesome as Valeta:)

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Kurt Kistler

August 16th, 2010
10:59 am

We sold the Kalwall product to Holder Construction who is the G.C. for Atlanta Ballet. We are very pleased to see that our product has contributed to such an amazing design.

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James Earl Jones

August 18th, 2010
5:41 pm

Kenny Leon’s True Colors theater can pull in all the names from old school tv personalities to top movie actors but the way they produce,cast and direct is one big political scam, providing the theater community with crap! It seems he saves the real talent for NY city and Atlanta is left with untrained actors and comercialized theater! Do us all a favor True Colors and learn how to cast and direct!

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James

August 18th, 2010
6:20 pm

Boring and mindless why out of all the great plays did you have to put this crap on stage should stay in the book where you got it from! PS and why don’t you stop directing Mr. Leon you are a much better actor. Oh and get a casting director who can CAST!

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Cicel Orango

August 23rd, 2010
5:01 pm

When it come to theater in this town I would grade it a big C- the lack of creativity and talent are far and few. The Kenny Leon Productions have been so boring and lack of talent that I had to leave during intermission!

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Ruth

August 25th, 2010
11:36 am

Bravo! Debbie Allen does such wonderful work and I am so thrilled to know that this exciting work is soon to be presented. As founder and director of Destiny Productions Theater Ensemble in Philadelphia, Pa, I am constantly looking for great examples to inspire my aspiring artists. Perhaps we can take a road trip and see this work first hand.

Blessings,
Ruth C. Chapman
Destiny Productions Theater Ensemble
http://www.destinyproductionsonline.com

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Linda (Howse) Wood

September 8th, 2010
3:36 pm

Another “Bravo!” for Tena Clark, songwriter.
Among some of her many accomplishments she was recently commissioned to compose the theme song for NASA’s Centennial of Flight Program.
More about Tena Here: http://tenaclark.com/
The folks in her hometown of Waynesboro, Mississippi are extremely proud of her.

Lind (Howse) Wood

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Joe

September 8th, 2010
7:58 pm

Great place! Here are some pictures I took there about 2 weeks ago! http://www.photojoeblog.com/the-atlanta-aquarium

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Vastsnignee

September 9th, 2010
3:27 am

Excellent blogpost!! Very informative… Looking for more posts like this!! Keep you the goodwork!
Anyway thank you for this blog.

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Jane greenberger

September 11th, 2010
10:43 pm

I saw the show today and it was thrilling…. I’d like to see it a second time and may.
I was looking for the review that was in the AJC last week and I was out of town. I’d like to read it but couldnt’ bring it up on the computer.
An absolute fantastic production. cast… dancing. singing. the lead boy was thrilling and it was such a touching production!

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[...] Atlanta, “Flux Projects founder gives $90,000 for arts criticism in Atlanta,” September 14, [...]

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R

September 15th, 2010
8:07 am

They are the Suzi (with an i) Bass Awards.

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Leslye Joy Allen

September 15th, 2010
8:15 am

This would be fantastic for such a fantastic production!!

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Doc Lawrence

September 15th, 2010
9:15 am

Tom’s adaptation has Broadway stamped on the cover page. The story will never die and America love New Orleans now more than ever.

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abby

September 15th, 2010
9:23 am

The show at Theatrical Outfit was phenomenal. It would be great for them (and Atlanta!) to get some well-deserved recognition!

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Marlene Dickinson

September 15th, 2010
9:40 am

It was great to see your very colorful production. So pleased your adaptation came to life for Atlanta audiences to enjoy. Congrats on the off-Broadway/Broadway buzz. With such a strong ensemble, brilliantly double-cast and having achieved airtight timing, the original cast MUST go with the show. May they they head for New York with long, streaming neck scarves dancing behind in the breeze – an image we won’t soon forget. Thanks!

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William Jenkins

September 15th, 2010
10:18 am

Dr. Black
This is a great read. Provocative and creatively insightful for readers with an inquisitive spirit. Also, thanks for signing it too!

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Kathleen McManus (Mrs. Reilly)

September 15th, 2010
11:00 am

Onward, Fortuna, ONWARD!!!!

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Liz Kippels

September 15th, 2010
12:24 pm

When last we saw him, Ignatius was headed for New York. How wonderfully appropriate!

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camille lemon

September 15th, 2010
1:53 pm

It would be fantastic to see this play on Broadway…ESPECIALLY with the Atlanta cast members. As I recal Ignatius and Myrna were on their way to NY at the end of the play, n’est-ce pas?

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Betty Garrot

September 15th, 2010
7:10 pm

I grew up in New Orleans and have been a huge fan of this novel. You captured its humor and tragedy while bringing the characters to life in your amazing cast! This adaptation is a true genius-congrats on being recognized for it!

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Tene Davis

September 16th, 2010
1:05 am

Just saw Twist tonight… opening night…it was absolutely amazing! The cast was fabulous;notably the children were truly talented. Above all, the choreograpghy was exceptional. There was never a dull moment in the play. I thoroughly enjoyed Twist and highly recommend it. Welcome to Atlanta Ms. Allen. Well done!

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Charles Kendall Brown

September 16th, 2010
7:45 am

I saw the last performance of this amazing production. I was not prepared to see one of my favorite novels, that I’ve read so many times, so adeptly adapted to the stage.. and realized by a most talented creative team. Kudos to all involved. Thanks for bringing a tear to my eye for the memory of John Kennedy Toole. I am sure he would have been so proud to see it.

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Paul Donnelly

September 16th, 2010
9:48 pm

It would be wonderful and warranted for this company to take this gorgeous script to Broadway, but it would be also be wonderful for other major regional theaters to be given the opportunity to produce this script and add to the drumbeat behind a Broadway production. Why shouldn’t Chicago and Washington and San Francisco and Minneapolis and … have this treat?

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Evelyn Panter

September 18th, 2010
1:46 pm

I went to high school with Tena Clark and knew she was a talented musician, but what a star! The show was brilliant! Next step … Broadway, for sure! She and Debbie Allen have truly meshed their respective talents in this amazing production! The music, lyrics, choregraphy and costumes are right on!

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Brian Henson

September 20th, 2010
3:04 pm

I have seen this outstanding production three times. The dancing is high energy and the singing is breathtaking (especially from the young lady who plays Della). The show is a little too long and seems to get off track at times by putting more emphasis on Della rather than the main character Twist, for whom the storyline appears to have been written. I feel the creative team will make the necessary changes to shorten the show and put more emphasis on the Twist character by adding a few sub-plots before it appears on stage elsewhere. I would have liked too see more scenes where the children performed, whereas they were an extremely talented bunch. One scene I didn’t like was Shuck it RAW!!!! For a musical so highly touted as being a “Family Show”, this number borders on being a bit too raunchy with some of the obscene dance moves in this number, especially for young audience members. Don’t want to sound like I am being negative, because I am not. This a wonderful production and by far the best the Alliance Theater has had in the last few years. This is MUST SEE before it ends!!!!!

On a side note…. I am extremely disappointed in the Alliance’s marketing of this production. I understand that the Art community has taken a major blow with public funding, however, I expected more out of Max Leventhal and Susan Booth. The lack of advance marketing of this show (tv, radio, newspaper) makes one question their leadership. In previous years, the marketing department did a wonderful job of promoting shows. I have been attending shows for years and can say without a doubt, this show has been the best in quite a few years and truly deserved more support from the Alliance.

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nick

September 21st, 2010
7:11 am

Saw the play over the Labor Day weekend. I am now reading the book. Hope it comes to Chicago someday also.

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[...] Culture briefs: Dali’s ‘Persistence,’ ‘Laramie’ arrive early [Source: CBS News](AP) Pamela Anderson and Marilyn Monroe may be names that come to mind when one thinks of the art of Playboy, but how about Salvador Dali? A Dali watercolor of a reclining nude that hung in Hugh Hefner's bedroom is among 125 artworks being auctioned by the … [Click here to Read the Full Article/NEWS] [...]

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Robert

November 27th, 2010
3:10 pm

The depths of Dali’s talent are rarely appreciated. Don’t miss this opportunity to experience this great artist.

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Jules

December 1st, 2010
11:17 am

I’ll be there tomorrow with bells on. It’s going to be fun….

:-)

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Hannah Hightower

December 22nd, 2010
12:35 pm

Would like to submit my original opera CHATELAINE that is complete with libretto, piano/vocal and orchestral scores. The opening act is set in Georgia. Please, advise. And, Happy Holidays!

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Miko

December 22nd, 2010
4:05 pm

Inception should have been number one in my book!

thanks,

http://www.the404list.com

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ronald

December 23rd, 2010
10:27 am

The fact that Inception isn’t on the list is another indicator that this is clownish. How many critic’s proclaimed Inception best film of the year? I watched it twice and both times people just sat around in pleasured disbelief after the film ended. It was very moving.

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Traci M

December 23rd, 2010
11:30 am

I’ve seen a lot of movies this year and Winter’s Bone gets my vote for Best Picture. The story is gripping, raw, and real. The actors look like they themselves have been living the brutal, drug-laden life of the characters they portray. The cinematography just pulls you in. The acting is superb. Jennifer Lawrence should be nominated for an Oscar. At one moment she is older and wiser than her years, in the next, you realize the weight of the world is on the shoulders only a young child. John Hawkes is just as compelling as Ree’s uncle, who fights not to get sucked in to a losing battle, then fights equally hard as to save his niece. You must see this movie.

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[...] the original: Culture notes: Holocaust film; 3 Ponce area galleries unite; Dana S… Related Posts:Culture notes: Holocaust film; 3 Ponce area galleries unite; Dana S… The Breman [...]

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[...] AJC Living section – Culture Notes [...]

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J. Richardson

January 7th, 2011
11:27 am

Why did you leave the R out of Grizzard ? on the front page of the ajc.com

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John

January 7th, 2011
12:05 pm

I saw this show a few years ago in Canton. Bill Oberst makes you think that you are seeing and hearing Lewis Grizzard himself. Any Grizzard fan should see it.

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[...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Fabrefaction Theatre, AJC Arts & Culture. AJC Arts & Culture said: Culture notes: Satiric twist on Peanuts at Fabrefaction, a dancing ‘Peter Pan,’ http://bit.ly/eKLyRu [...]

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keif

February 24th, 2011
3:01 am

Will this exhibit (or the High) also point to and celebrate Hale Woodruff’s six magnificent “The Art of the Negro” murals housed in the atrium of CAU’s Trevor Arnett Hall? They are treasures right here in our own backyard.

For an introduction see http://www.cau.edu/art_gallery/art_gal_mur_right.html

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[...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by KSU Art Museum, AJC Arts & Culture. AJC Arts & Culture said: High Museum to restore, exhibit famed Talladega College murals (1939-40 ) by black art leader Hale Woodruff http://bit.ly/gydi3T [...]

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[...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Atlanta Symphony and Grayson Daughters, Chastain Park Amp. Chastain Park Amp said: RT @AtlantaSymphony: Exciting week for @AtlantaSymphony – 1st release on ASO Media is out! http://is.gd/elPdBm Buy/Download your copy: … [...]

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Featured | Atlanta City Paper

February 25th, 2011
5:29 pm

[...] Atlanta Arts and Culture [...]

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[...] is the first review in a major media market. [...]

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Travis S. Taylor

March 26th, 2011
2:00 am

I think it’s great that so many organizations, companie, and private citizens are doing so much to assist with the relief efforts in Japan following the earthquake/tsunami. Southerners truly are generous.

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Flora Rosefsky

April 6th, 2011
11:29 pm

Thank you Howard Pousner and the AJC for your online cultural notes regarding the Atlanta arts community! It’s most appreciated by those who create the work and for those who appreciate it. Venues like the Atlanta Central Public Library art gallery, with its refreshing commitment to special visual arts exhibitions, become additional treasures in the overall visual arts offerings for the Atlanta community. .

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The Real Patron

April 15th, 2011
12:55 pm

Bad news!!

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[...] Atlanta Journal-Constitution [...]

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Cai

April 21st, 2011
10:04 pm

George Spelvin

May 10th, 2011
6:05 pm

Well they seem to have enough money to hire a third party PR firm that handles ALL emails from the BCA to citizens. They are all labeled from “Atlanta Jazz Festival” aka The Rigsby group even when the jazz festival is not ‘in season’. Seems a bit odd to get emails from Atlanta Bureau of Cultural affairs, always labeled “Atlanta jazz festival” and from this third party PR firm.

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Pee Wee

May 16th, 2011
4:26 pm

I’m sure Stephen is a great man like his father who futhered the cause of equal rights.

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Arts N ATL

May 16th, 2011
4:27 pm

Good thought Pee Wee but I don’t think there’s any relation to MLK.

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Pee Wee

May 16th, 2011
4:30 pm

Flora Rosefsky

June 4th, 2011
1:16 am

AJC readers really appreciate your expanded coverage of the arts with articles like the ones written by Howard Pousner. Capturing the essence of visual arts events and happenings, beyond the more well known Atlanta art venues, continues to be refreshing.Now to get the metro-Atlanta community to seek out some wonderful shows at places like The ART Station in Stone Mountain Village or a planetarium show at the Tellus Museum in Cartersville..

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lance carlson

June 4th, 2011
9:21 am

Looking forward to the opening at ART station of Endangered Species~Found Paper
thank you AJC for the coverage!

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George Spelvin

June 7th, 2011
8:23 pm

Please these worthy theatres with their fundraising goals. These funds help keep theatre tickets affordable for their productions.

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jeff

June 21st, 2011
10:46 am

Why didn’t the AJC interview Dan Cook, the winner?
He is from Lilburn and currently works in Norcross.

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[...] Howard Pousner [...]

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[...] Here’s a link to a great interview with Bailey, who moved with his family to Atlanta in 1972 and attended the old Atlanta College of Art next door to the High. Racliffe Bailey and Victoria Rowell with Dorys and Julius "Dr. J" Erving [...]

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MBA Mama

June 29th, 2011
11:45 am

I went to HS with Radcliff (GO RAIDERS!) and he was very talented even then. I wish him the best at his exhibition and can’t wait to see it for myself.

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Robert J. Farley

June 30th, 2011
11:35 pm

Sincerest congrats to Rachel, Del, and all their cohorts. Great season!!! My best, Bob

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Robert J. Farley

June 30th, 2011
11:35 pm

Enter your comments here

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Kathy Janich

July 2nd, 2011
4:45 pm

It’s our 14th season at Synchronicity (not 13th). It’s going to be a fun and wild ride. Come play with us!

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cg

July 4th, 2011
11:52 pm

Really????? Why don’t we have an Irish American White Arts Festival? Come on, so tired of those in the Black community who are still so shallow with such little self respect that they must continue tooting the black horn. In God’s eyes we’re all the same. Grow up.

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Jay

July 5th, 2011
1:08 am

I agree cg we’re all the same. So why are you complaining? All people of color come to this event, and for the record it’s not just/ATL black community. You are shallow. People comes from all over U.S. world to display their talent and exhibits. National Black Arts Festival guide including arts, literature, visual arts, celebrity appearances, entertainers and more. you are so uneducated. Diversity is here to stay in Georgia regardless of who your Governor is.

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JS

July 5th, 2011
1:54 am

Thank you cg!!! I couldn’t agree with you more. If we had a White American
Arts Festival the protestors would be out in droves and caling the ACLU.I am also tired of all this Black this and that I thought they wanted equal rights and to be on the same playing level with everyone else.

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ok

July 5th, 2011
2:14 am

CG&JS~~~bitter arent we… must be sometype of struggling artist ;-( This is a pretty diverse event with art that has an “african” perspective. Why is that not ok?

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Jay

July 5th, 2011
2:55 am

JS you used the word “they” are you talking about black people? People of all color attend the festival. But of course, your dumb@@@ wouldn’t know that b/c it’s a Black Arts Festival . Stupidity a lack of intelligence.

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KK

July 5th, 2011
2:57 am

Yeah, yeah, whine, whine, can’t wait to get the hell outta Georgia. Too many closed minded folks still talking about Black this and why Whites do that, blah, blah, blah, find something more important to get emotional about, geez.

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GUNGA DIN

July 5th, 2011
4:12 am

Black Arts Festival ??? isn’t this reverse racism at its’ worst. isn’t Atlanta all about diversity. just imagine a White Arts Festival and all the hoopla. Al and Jesse would be hear in a flash mouthing off in front of the cameras!!!!

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T

July 5th, 2011
4:54 am

CG & JS have you ever been to the Black Arts Festival? Probably not. Because you would know that there are lots of people who attend who are not black. Historically, minority artists were not featured in many festivals, so the BAF. Go ahead and start your White Arts Festival oh, that is called the dogwood festival right?

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J Moore

July 5th, 2011
5:37 am

Is anybody else totally sick of “black” this or “black” that? If blacks can’t compete without affirmative action and set-asides, then too bad.

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B4 Real

July 5th, 2011
5:57 am

“Imagine if we had a White arts festival in atlanta…” You have one its called the Renaissance Festival. And what does a arts festival have to do with affirmitive action? I’m missing the connection. We don’t need to ask permission or assistance to celebrate our culture.

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cwmathes

July 5th, 2011
10:55 pm

Yes to a Black Arts Festival. It is the art part you need to see. Whether the artist is Black, White, Southern, Jewish, Japanese or European is not what you are looking for-look for the artistry in their art. Think arts for arts’ sake.

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BPJ

July 6th, 2011
10:12 pm

Every October there is a festival for people of Scottish descent at Stone Mountain (the festival is open to all, just like the Black Arts festival). Bagpipes are played, Scottish dances performed, and yes, Scotch is consumed. So why is it OK when those of us whose ancestors came from Scotland celebrate that, but not OK when African-Americans do it?

Hypocrites.

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TellTheTruth

July 7th, 2011
7:59 am

So many thoughts…anyway…when black artists could display there crafts at the Piedmont Arts Festival back in the day…there wasn’t a Black Arts Festival. But overtime you could not find black art at this festival or the Decatur Art’s festival. So thanks to Micheal Lomax the city welcomed the establishment of the Black Arts Festival. And I glad that he did and I am glad that the city continues to sponsor this event!

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Jas

July 7th, 2011
10:19 am

I wish all white people could live the life of a black person for just one week. Or talk to an 80 year old black person. Then you’d understand.

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Travis S. Taylor

July 19th, 2011
7:30 pm

Thanks for the information about the public art installation coming up at Underground…looking forward to seeing what it will be!

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Marietta Mary

July 25th, 2011
5:17 pm

Edgerton will be at the Decatur Book Festival, reading from this and SINGING Saturday, 1:45 at Decatur Presbyterian Sanctuary Stage.

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gb

September 23rd, 2011
9:59 am

Arts and Culture non-profits are a billion dollar business in Atlanta. Art does live here. Way to get the word out.

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Sally Corbett

November 2nd, 2011
11:08 am

It was also great to hear Gov. Deal give credence to the idea of “STEAM” (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math) approach to education rather than the more narrow and potentially less innovative “STEM” approach. His expression of enthusiasm about the development of a new auto tag in support of the arts was also favorable.

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[...] More at AJC’s blog. By lschnellinger on November 2, 2011. Share | var addthis_config = {"data_track_clickback":true}; This entry was posted on Wednesday, November 2, 2011 at 1:40 pmand is filed under General, Regional. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site. [...]

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philip brachman

November 4th, 2011
8:35 am

Howcan one nominate a local visual artist for consideration for this prize?

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Howard Pousner

November 4th, 2011
2:15 pm

Here’s contact info:
Artadia: The Fund for Art and Dialogue

210 Eleventh Ave., Suite 503, New York, NY 10001 | (212) 727-2233 | http://www.artadia.org

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Steve Upshaw

November 7th, 2011
10:45 pm

Bravo ASO. Now NYC knows what we already know; we have a GREAT orchestra and conductor.

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Ann Morrow

December 7th, 2011
4:30 pm

I just spent over an hour watching Gyun Hur create her wonderful instillation at the Hudgens Center for the arts. She is amazing and so friendly to talk to and answer questions. This is a must do experience.

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danisha nelson

December 15th, 2011
12:03 pm

Hey Check out the New Orleans Jazz Fest http://www.nojazzfest.com

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[...] indeed orders are pouring in from all across the country. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution‘s Arts & Culture blog called the new publications “a veritable renaissance in the Southern humorist’s [...]

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[...] Happy New Year, readers! We could not imagine better timing than Day 1 of 2012 for a first look at t… [...]

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[...] and Diego Rivera coming to the AGO this fallNational Post (blog)Oye! Times -Torontoist -Atlanta Journal Constitution (blog)all 23 news articles » .nrelate .nr_sponsored{ left:0px !important; } // [...]

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Larry

February 6th, 2012
11:10 pm

That’s wonderful I’ am a big fan of Radcliffe Bailey’s artwork I’m also proud of him cause we come from the same area in Atlanta and we went to the same high school Benjamin E. Mays High School.

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Debdoes

March 19th, 2012
6:49 pm

Truely disappointing, but I also closed a shoppe there and no one came to my aide except my wonderful customers who were amazing during my closing. The city needs to work with the landlords and do something about the high rent district for a low revenue producing area!

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Terrible loss

March 19th, 2012
6:50 pm

There will be a lot of people who won’t care or will make light of this, but it’s devastating for the metro Atlanta arts community. I’ve seen many wonderful, consistently high-quality productions there and am deeply saddened to hear about this. Extremely bad news for theater lovers (and actors, directors, stage managers and the behind-the-scenes people who make it all happen). I’ll miss Theatre in the Square a lot.

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chc4

March 19th, 2012
6:56 pm

It’s called a free market. If a business can’t be self-sustaining then it will go away. Doesn’t matter if it’s a theater, shoe store or accounting firm.

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TheUselessGAPolitican

March 19th, 2012
6:58 pm

I’d love to say I care, but I’ve simply got too much money to chase. I’m a crook, remember. FU to Theatre on whatever square. Where was it at, Conyers?

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Floyd Taylor

March 19th, 2012
6:59 pm

The sad part is that Theatre in the Square was in COBB County– as we all know the COBB County Commissioners to this day have never rescinded their infamous Anti-Gay Resolution that was triggered by a Baptist Minister disliking a play produced at Theatre in the Square that had gay overtones. Cobb County keeps reminding us that the county does not like art in any form except the Big Ckicken. This is why I still boycott the county whenever I can.

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Kimmy

March 19th, 2012
7:12 pm

They are only 250K away from their goal, and they have 3.5 months to get it done, and they’re calling it quits? With that type of mentality, they deserve to lose.

Here’s an idea, hire a fundraiser with the 83K you have, then make him raise 500K. Pays for itself. Duh. You “artists” are too cute.

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Sad News

March 19th, 2012
7:34 pm

Those of you rushing to judgments and making proclamations about the free market at work don’t understand the volatility of the nonprofit professional theatre business model. It’s a complicated group of factors that led to the company’s demise. It’s a sad day for the cultural community of our metro area.

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Deservedly so...

March 19th, 2012
7:57 pm

Unfortunately this is a blow for Marietta. It would have been nice to keep the Theater. However, they only have themselves to blame. Their spending was out of control and until very recently did nothing to reign it in. A new facade, 10k sq ft of office space, etc and they expected others to continue to throw money at them.

If is not “the volatility of the nonprofit professional theatre business model” that did them in. It was their own mismanagement. They built a business model based upon spending what they wanted to spend and then asking for donations. Had they been more cost-conscience, they would not be closing today.

Sad, but deserved.

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Zorro-3

March 19th, 2012
7:58 pm

chc4… No need to get all Ayn Rand on us. No one here has called for a government bailout. But that theater served the city well for thirty years and whatever has changed (the economy, people’s tastes…) that renders it no longer viable…is worth lamenting.

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Sad Day

March 19th, 2012
8:10 pm

I’ve seen some really great theater over the years at T-Square. I’m sorry to hear that they are closing. This is a sad day for theater lovers in the Atlanta metro area.

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chc4

March 19th, 2012
8:58 pm

Zorro-3: I wasn’t making a political statement. Simply a matter of reality. And as was pointed out above, this could very well be a case of money mismanagement. I have no idea if that’s true but it doesn’t change the overall point.

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TB

March 19th, 2012
9:26 pm

This is really sad news. Whatever the reasons, the Theater has been around for decades and brings a lot of business to us store owners/restaurant owners on the Square. I’m wondering what kind of ripple effect this will cause to other businesses….. :(

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Brandon

March 19th, 2012
9:38 pm

I’ll take”totally irrelevant and unnecessary” for $1000, Floyd Taylor….

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Mike Huff

March 19th, 2012
9:49 pm

God Bless Jean..she was my friend there from the beginning until now, the unfortunate end. Tearfully, MIKE

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Nathan

March 19th, 2012
11:55 pm

I have to say that I am a little bit offended by the comments made by some of these people who think that this is the appropriate time to bash this poor theatre and all who were involved with it. I am a college actor who wants to move to Atlanta and pursue theatre as a career for at least a couple of years, and this situation now leaves me even fewer choices for a job than I already have. Not only am I saddened for myself, and I am saddened for this community that will not have the opportunity to see the different perspectives on controversial issues that many people share whilst in the theatre. Oh and The UselessGAPolitician, that’s a good ol’ Georgian, Republican, don’t care about anybody but myself kind of attitude. Good job.

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Georgia Retiree

March 19th, 2012
11:58 pm

Much of the blame goes to the Marietta City Councilman, landlord and owner of much of the property on the square, who until recently would not reduce the rent to a theatre that is bringing a lot of folks to the restaurants and shops on the square, which will eventually reduce his income from rent, as some go out of business.

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Deb S

March 20th, 2012
6:33 am

A very sad day in Atlanta for sure – I am sure they did everything they possible could to save it. A true loss to the community.

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JTH

March 20th, 2012
10:06 am

@Kimmy, that is the dumbest comment I have ever read. You honestly think hiring a fundraiser would have saved the theatre? You do understand that non-profit theatres are not churches, right? They are supported primarily by applying for grants through local and state arts councils. Private donations are nice and lovely- but if they are not receiving steady grant support for operating expenses or special projects, it is really tough to stay open. You “non-artists” are even cuter. I just love how someone who doesn’t know the first thing about how to run a non-profit automatically assumes what happened. You don’t know what happened. Nobody probably ever will know exactly what happened. And I also love the view that if a non-profit isn’t run like a “normal” business it somehow deserves to close. Non-profits are recognized by the IRS and the Government because people want the arts to enrich their lives. They don’t want another ice cream shop in downtown Marietta.

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John Thigpen, Set Designer

March 20th, 2012
10:51 am

This is sad. Theatre in the Square has a great following, does quality work and kept ticket prices low. I don’t think people understand how grants, donations and sponsorships support not-for-profit cultural institutions and allow the average person to see a show for a good price, sometimes equal or less than the cost of a movie ticket. If all the small professional not-for profit theatres had to rely on ticket prices alone for revenue, they would have to charge prices comparable to the Broadway tours that come through town to pay the overhead for the smaller venues. These smaller theatre produce exciting, diverse work. They add value to the surrounding community by bringing business to them. Nearby restaurants and retail businesses benefit by the extra patronage from theatregoers.

I have worked there off and on since the beginning. I watched the square rebound through the efforts of the theatre and the businesses that rebuilt the square. I always looked forward to working there and dining for lunch and dinner at the surrounding restaurants. We always planned to have dinner on the square before a show.

I can speak for behind the scenes budgets. They were small and not out of control. The many designers and technicians did amazing work on a shoestring budget. Sometimes working long hours above and beyond what is required in a regular job. They maintained respect for the actors as well. The production values and talent onstage were maintained at high level for reasonable costs when compared to commercial productions.

I always felt amazing community support from the audiences. This is something that grew over time, and is difficult to maintain as a not-for-profit. Theatre in the Square did it. The memories of all the wonderful productions, shared with others, will stay in people’s mind. That achievement will never be taken away from them.

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MacMillar

March 20th, 2012
11:05 am

@Floyd Taylor… I remember that. I was working in a small local theatre right out of high school, and I recall the uproar over the gay character in a play at the Theatre in the Square. I admit, I don’t think I ever went to see a show there after that. Not because I was upset with the theatre, but because I was upset with Cobb County. That was 20 years ago, and I’m sure I missed some good shows. It’s sad to see anyone close after so long. Good luck to the leasing company… theatre spaces don’t easily transform into coffee shops.

I can’t help but wonder if local community theatre is going to disappear in this town someday. In this technological age, where you can download on demand just about any form of entertainment you want, how much longer will people drive a ways down the road to see a show?

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Theater Owner

March 20th, 2012
2:31 pm

Theaters both professional and community are dieing all over the US. A little facts for all of you that never owned their own theater building this does not include theater companies. For how meny theaters that start up how meny make it to a second season. You start with 100 the first year by the second you are down to 50. Now of that 50 how meny make it to year 5? Answer 5 Now you take a theater that lasted 30 years, “WHAT DOES THAT TELL YOU!” Palmer knows what he is doing! Live theater is the only are form of its kind. You have all of the art forms mixed into one then if you own the theater YOU ARE ALWAYS THE BAD GUY! After having a theaters for over 20 years and 8 locations there is always one true fact ” It is your blood and you pay your bills after the weekend.” Hoping there is money left over! I hope this will help you understand what Palmer has gone through for the last 30 years.
John….

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Todd Olson

March 20th, 2012
2:40 pm

I think the saddest part about this story is how a community reacts upon the passing of a cultural institution whose only mandate was to create art and serve a town. There is such meanness and divisivness here in this thread (and in past threads about this subject), no wonder there wasn’t enough of a base of enlightened people to support a professional theatre. And it sounds like there’s more than enough religious figures in this theatres past to reflect a cultural distrust of the arts at all. Maybe there was mismanagement, I don’t know. All of the economists in this tread seem to be pretty sure of the challenges of running a NFP theatre these days; it aint a hardware store, you know? A bunch of artists just lost their jobs. Ask yourself why you’re taking this opportunity to deride them. They’re your neighbors. I would say look at yourself in the dang mirror…but you lost an important cultural mirror when this theatre closed.

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Sad News

March 21st, 2012
7:30 am

@Todd…you hit the nail on the head. Beautifully said.

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Alan McNaron

March 21st, 2012
9:00 am

Beyond sad and disappointing. Hate to see such a great town lose such an addition of it’s charm and character.

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Everyman

March 22nd, 2012
12:42 am

Angry and scared, all of you who find joy or satisfaction in this event. Shame on you. I’m charged to have compassion for you but you make it difficult. Your anger lowers your IQ; your fear makes you want to hurt others. How sad that you would spend so much energy writing about that which you do not understand. I’m sure your parents and your preachers are proud of you. Not.

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Joyce Mitchell

March 27th, 2012
8:31 am

These kinds of books are the stuff of life. I can’t wait to get my copy. It doesn’t appear that Atlanta is part of the book tour, which is sad because he’s so close. I would love to hear this author speak.

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Tom Howick

March 28th, 2012
3:48 pm

I am reading the book now and it is great read and maybe we can get David to come and do a book reading & signing at the Chattahoochee Nature Center in the future. He is a friend of mine and he is a great naturalist, scientist, and writer. Director of Education at the Chattahoochee Nature Center, Roswell, GA

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FM Fats

April 5th, 2012
2:21 pm

Howard, if I am not mistaken “Ghost Brothers of Darkland County” opened last night at the Alliance Theater. I can’t seem to find a review of it in the AJC today. Is there a reason for this? Was it a soft opening?

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Howard Pousner

April 5th, 2012
4:15 pm

Official opening night is next Wednesday, April 11. The shows until then are considered “previews.”

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FM Fats

April 5th, 2012
4:40 pm

Thanks. There’s absolutely no indication of that on the Alliance website, as far as I can tell.

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FM Fats

April 6th, 2012
2:54 pm

Wow. Paideia skunked in the Hensleys. Heads are gonna roll!

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Proud Papa

April 8th, 2012
4:11 pm

Milton actually received nominations in 11 categories, plus an honorable mention for two actors (together) in Featured Performer.

If my count is correct, Pebblebrook received 10 nominations plus an honorable mention, Starr’s Mill 10, Tri-Cities 9 and Riverwood 8 with an additional 2 honorable mentions.

Perennial favorite West Forsyth garners nominations in 6 categories, plus an honorable mention. Talk about heads rolling! Last year they had 11 nominations and took home 5 Shulers including Best Overall Production.

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Ward

April 10th, 2012
4:19 pm

Nice to see, but sadly, an awful lot of the pieces in the Gardens were ‘curated’ (or ‘cannibalized’ depending on your point of view) years ago. I just want to know if my drawing is still on one of the ceiling tiles in his studio. ;)

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steve

April 11th, 2012
8:58 am

Saw Ghost Brothers…. last night. Very enjoyable play. The main character was played by the understudy.

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FM Fats

April 15th, 2012
9:09 pm

We saw it Friday night. The staging is great and the music is terrific (and I’m not a big Mellencamp fan). It’s well worth seeing, but yeah, it needs some work. Guarini was better than I expected and Hensley wasn’t as good as I expected. Hensley has too much of a Broadway voice for this rootsy music. The story can be hard to follow and needs to be cleaned up.

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Jessica

April 16th, 2012
12:41 pm

I have seen it three times, and I have love it more each time. The first time that I saw it I was tepid in my reaction it despite my love ofe the music, but after the second time, I realized that this show is full of Kingism and has the makings of a hit. It does need a bit of tweaking here and there. A major overhaul, however, might ruin the magic. If you look at early reviews of Wicked, you would think it would only last six months. Look where it is now.

Here are a couple of more reviews:

http://www.atlantatheaterfans.com/2012/04/ghost-brothers-ofdarkland-county-atlanta-theater-fans-review/

http://www.artsatl.com/2012/04/review-%e2%80%9cghost-brothers%e2%80%9d-soars-with-mellencamp%e2%80%99s-music-but-is-very-much-a-work-in-progress/

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Mike

April 16th, 2012
1:48 pm

The New York Post review is amazingly malicious coming from someone who’s never even seen the show.

I’ve often heard that snobs who live in big cities aren’t nearly as worldly as people who live elsewhere, because they think that what they have is so much better than everything else. This certainly proves it. He probably hasn’t given any thought to Georgia since “the Dukes of Hazzard.”

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Seabrook Fan

April 17th, 2012
9:31 am

I just returned from a weekend in Beaufort SC. It was a beautiful area, I was lucky enough to see three bald eagles. I look forward to reading Mr. Seabrook’s book.

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Nathan Sharratt

April 17th, 2012
10:37 am

While any positive ranking for Atlanta arts is a good thing, this article should be qualified in that it only counts creatives employed by a business (including architects and others not nocessarily considered by the general public to be “artists”) in the city proper (pop. 400k). It does not, therefore, include almost all fine artists or anyone outside the city limits.

I think the second metric stating legislative arts support (being 50th in nation) is a more accurate litmus of the state in Atlanta for what most consider “arts” related.

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George Spelvin

May 3rd, 2012
7:43 pm

In Act One we saw Mr. Russell turn down $30,000 from city of Maritta and cease fundraing efforts to keep Theatre in The Square in the RED thru next season.
Act Two opens with the closing of the theatre followed almost immediately by Mr. Russell et al asking for $50,000 from same fund via City of Marietta and the launch of a New campaign of $475,000 for an upstart theatre troup that will occupy the same building and potentially receive access to all the previous inventory of the defunct Theatre in the Square courtesy of the landlord that, on a whim, bought everything from the bank that acquired property by default.
(the curtain is lowered and partially destroyed to denote the passage of time.) Stay tuned for Act Three.

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George Spelvin

May 3rd, 2012
9:47 pm

Correction: Act One fundraising was to get Theatre in the Square in the BLACK for another complete season. Any references to a play named the other color, or the financial situation of the same name are regrettable. Please enjoy your pre-ordered refreshments during the interval.

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JP Peterson

May 3rd, 2012
10:54 pm

Thank you Palmer, for the biggest break of my career and 15 years of steady work onstage.

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Susie Q

May 6th, 2012
10:12 pm

This is my second year as a member. I LOVE everything at the Atlanta Botanical Garden except the scuptures. It is juvenile and tacky.

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jubullyreb

May 7th, 2012
12:01 am

The fabulous ABG has created a fabulous exhibit to be viewed only by fabulous citizens bedecked in fabulous attire drinking fabulous concoctions behind the fabulous overwrought iron gates which keep the hoi polloi well out of view. Great job making sure to keep THOSE PEOPLE fully separated from the nouveau riche elite, who can hitch a ride over from the Driving Club in a Club Car without spilling a precious drop of gin. For me, I pray nightly for locusts. There has never been an Atlanta institution which stole so much from the citizens and gave so little.

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John Schmedes

May 7th, 2012
7:38 pm

Thanks Palmer for so many years of your life devoted to so many great shows and huge contribution to the arts and to the city of Marietta.

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John Saunders

May 13th, 2012
8:25 pm

Thanks for the excellent review. Wiley Cash’s novel is one of the best that I
have read in a long time. His prose reminds me a lot of Cormac McCarthy’s
work. I look forward to reading everything written by Mr. Cash. He is a great
talent. Plot is fast-paced. Characterizations are believable. There is mystery
and forgiveness. I appreciate the fact that Cash shows respect for his readers
as well as the characters in the novel. This is a violent and uplifting book.
“a land kinder than home” comes close to being flawless. Its characters will haunt
me for many years. The portrait of community reminds me of Juan Rulfo’s fine
novel: “Pedro Paramo”. When Wiley Cash’s book tour brings him to Texas —
I look forward to meeting him. Maybe he will make an appearance at Texas
Book Festival later this year. Thank you, Wiley Cash, for the fine novel that
you have created.

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chappy

May 16th, 2012
3:02 pm

LOVE the sculptures at the garden! Well worth a trip.

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BPJ

May 28th, 2012
1:27 pm

There’s nothing odd about the contrast between Atlanta’s relatively robust arts community (which includes arts nonprofits such as museums, theatres, the symphony, ballet, as well as creatve businesses such as Turner, advertising companies, design businesses) and the state’s dismal funding for georgia Council for the Arts. There has always been a distinct contrast between Atlanta and most of the rest of the state. That’s why the County Unit System existed for decades – to reduce Atlanta’s influence in statewide primary elections.

If the Atlanta representatives in the legislature were the only votes that counted, then GCA would be well funded. But the rest of the state’s representatives have generally voted otherwise (yes there are exceptions scattered around the state).

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Kyle Vaughn

May 31st, 2012
9:26 am

This is such a sad day. The Hottie Hawgs family and Riverside Community will miss Mr. I terribly.

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Kimberly Vaughn

May 31st, 2012
9:35 am

This is such sad news, what an amazing man. Please keep us all updated on memorial/funeral plans and how we can all help.
Thanks,

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FM Fats

May 31st, 2012
12:19 pm

We spent an afternoon with Mr. I in February and visited with him whenever he took part in the Kentuck Festival near Tuscaloosa. He was a lovely soul, full of energy and spirit. He invited us back to share some things from his garden, but we have lost that opportunity. According to gallery owner Jeanine Taylor, Gregory’s passing was the result of a spider bite and ensuing pneumonia. So many of the great southern vernacular artists are gone now: Tolliver, Suddeth, Finster, R A Miller, Myrtice West, B F Perkins, Annie Wellborn, Joe Light, Willie Jinks, Tobey Ivey. Let’s continue to treasure the ones who are still around like Bernice Sims, Lonnie Holley, Charlie Lucas Buddy Snipes, John Henry Toney, and Alpha Andrews. These are people who along with our great writers, cooks, and musicians make the South a magical place.

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Reetha Lee Dubinkin

May 31st, 2012
4:19 pm

Mr I will be missed by many in the Lehigh Valley. He was such a lovely person.

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[...] Here’s a link to the story in the AJC: http://blogs.ajc.com/arts-culture/2012/05/30/atlanta-folk-artist-mr-imagination-dies/ [...]

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Friends of Cabbagetown

May 31st, 2012
8:59 pm

Alan H. Stradtler

June 2nd, 2012
1:15 am

This comes as a surprise to me. I knew Mr. I when he lived in Chicago. We use to spent afternoons together at his apartment. I remember asking Ellen Sandor to think of having Mr. I do an art piece using her technology called a Pschlogram. I have a large one over my bed. I have numerous pieces of his work. my personal favorite are the gold hands that where modeled from his own hands & which he also used on his projects; most notably at the various House of Blues locations. I will think of him with fond memories. May God bless him. —

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Debra Levie

June 2nd, 2012
11:45 pm

I had the good fortune to meet Mr. Imagination in the late 1980’s in Chicago. He had an amazing place above the street and next to the Howard and Ravenswood Lines of the CTA. He told me of his Grandmother. Some of us met and sang in his kitchen. I met his brother who worked with Cools Cigarette packs to form pocketbooks. I purchased some of his sand sculpture necklaces. We did a bit of club hopping on the north side.
A few moments ago, something/someone directed me to the Carl Hammer site. (I never go there.) I saw a death year give and discovered his death was a few days past. Rest well.

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[...] of leather and club chairs, set of 4 1950’s leather & chrome chairs, industrial expresso [sic] machine, many misc modern sofas, chairs, coffee tables, king size bed with upholstred [sic] headboard, desks, contemporary bedroom furniture …Culture notes: Fay Gold hosting art-filled estate sale; WonderRoot names 12 Walthall fellowship hono… [...]

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Jennifer

June 23rd, 2012
7:32 pm

Gwinnett Ballet will hold an open audition for placement in fall classes on August 1 at the Gwinnett Performing Arts Center. Information is on http://www.gwinnettballet.org.

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Small Business

August 2nd, 2012
8:59 am

This is one of the great mysteries of Buffy for me.

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Cosi fan tutti was worth the price of admission

August 6th, 2012
7:32 pm

Just imagine that same opera house, but on the site of the Atlanta Civic Center. Beautiful building, but I wish it were downtown. Galleria isn’t that far, but still.

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Arthur Blank

August 6th, 2012
9:45 pm

This is a very difficult time for arts organizations across the country, including Atlanta. I wish Mr. Hanthorn the very best of luck in his future endeavors.

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Are you the Real Arthur Blank?

August 6th, 2012
10:27 pm

I agree a very difficult time.

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Judith Ripka

August 7th, 2012
8:58 am

I loved the list very interesting and i got to learn alot keep it up

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Not a Fangirl

August 7th, 2012
10:04 am

Finally the megalomaniac is gone. A glorious day!

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Tony Phillips

August 13th, 2012
5:17 pm

I will miss Susan. Her zeal was contagious. Her passion magnetic. Her boldness unsurpassed.

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Bill Thomas

August 13th, 2012
6:06 pm

Wow. Could Mr. Tucker have been more condescending towards Atlanta audiences? Who’s taking odds on whether The Italian Girl from Algiers is scrapped from this season? Or does that squeak by on to the list of the top 30 pieces. I guess this will be my last season as a subscriber.

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Retired Old Atlantan

August 15th, 2012
11:15 pm

Obviously this dispute between the musicians and ASO management is very serious to them. The reality is that 99% of Atlantans don’t really care whether the ASO is disbanded.

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Nosey Atlantan

August 15th, 2012
11:19 pm

What’s the average salary of the musicians?

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Worth Saving

August 15th, 2012
11:38 pm

It’d be a shame to lose the ASO. We shan’t let this happen.

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Former Cellist

August 16th, 2012
12:14 am

@Retired Old Atlantan…..How sad…

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Pam

August 16th, 2012
12:18 am

I just read that the ASO will not allow Lassister and Walton High Schools in Cobb County to participate in their holiday shows because they are not as racially diverse as they would like. The ASO has just lost my business. They should be sued for racism.

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MBW

August 16th, 2012
12:25 am

@Bill Thomas— It was a little condescending, but let’s face it: La Traviata and Carmen are not exactly bold programming. Italian Girl is less frequently produced, but Atlanta Opera has never been known for adventurous work.

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Pat

August 16th, 2012
12:43 am

@Pam – good for the ASO! As a lover of classical music I applaud the ASOs activism in relation to diversity and I also applaud their desire to share the burden of cuts with all staff. I am not an Atlanta resident. In fact, I live in Canada but I can well appreciate the cultural hole that will be left in Atlanta if the ASO were to shutter its doors.

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Charles of the South

August 16th, 2012
12:54 am

Pam, why are Canadians always sticking their noses into the affairs of our nation, first, our politics, our health care, not to mention the ear bending pundits on talk radio

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Joeventures

August 16th, 2012
1:02 am

@Pam -

In the ASO’s defense, and to be fair, the ASO didn’t disallow Lassiter & Walton from participating. They wanted to increase the number of participating schools. Unfortunately, there’s a limited amount of space on the stage, so the schools were asked to decrease the numbers of students participating from each school. The schools made the choice not to participate.

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Tim

August 16th, 2012
1:05 am

This weekend my family went to an ASO concert. It was wonderful. I wouyd like to do my part to help it grow. It reminds you that there is more to a civilized world than people sitting around writing negative postings. It is about civilization.

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Marie

August 16th, 2012
3:46 am

If the ASO’s management hadn’t been doing such a horrible job marketing the symphony for the past decade or so, maybe they would be able to sell enough tickets to fund the orchestra.

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Doug of the North

August 16th, 2012
5:32 am

Charles: why are Americans (like Paul Ryan) always sticking their noses into the affairs of Canada, first, our politics, our health care, not to mention our economy and oil.

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Jimbo

August 16th, 2012
6:06 am

What, management share the pain? That makes NO sense. Who will administer the pain, if they have to share in it.

Workers are interchangable cogs in the machine. Management are touched by GOD with brilliance and insight and are indespensible. We know this because they decided and told us so.

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ASO Patron

August 16th, 2012
6:07 am

The Atlanta Symphony is a treasure. I grew up watching them on television each year. Since 1996, they have not been on TV. I attend many concerts with 50% of the hall is empty. The orchestra has won 27 Grammy Awards. How can a city with millions of people not go to a concert? I think poor marketing, artistic programming, and lack of corporate support is to blame for these deficits. The ASO management needs to bring some fresh ideas into their leadership. Email blasts to existing patrons does not cultivate new audiences like television and direct business partnerships. Reducing salaries seems to be a quick fix but will not put patrons in those empty seats. Shame on the business communities for not supporting the musical Arts, How much has Coca Cola, Home Depot, Rollins, and other Atlanta corporations contribute to the Atlanta Symphony?

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Wrecker

August 16th, 2012
6:17 am

If the ASO musicians could make more money elsewhere at a more prestigious group, they would have done so. In case these union goons have not noticed, there has been a serious recession going on. Some of the first budget line items that people cut are charitable contributions and support for the arts, including orchestra tickets. Belt-tightening must occur at all levels.

The problem is one of perception with regard to management salaries. There may be several people at the top of the organization with large salaries, but even cutting these salaries to zero would not balance the budget. Most of the “managerial” salaries are contained in the multiple, low-level support staff jobs. Cutting these salaries 11% would devastae the finances of many of these people.

On the contrary, the musicians make significant salaries and have partially subsidized health costs. Musican’s salaries have increased in accordance with inflation since 2006, while staff salaries overall have decreased as a percentage. When the ASO added the Verizon venue, the additional staff increased the total dollars of staff salaries, but these are not million-dollar managerial jobs. I love music, musicians, and the ASO, but if they strike noone will notice or have sympathy for them.

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GB

August 16th, 2012
7:27 am

In case anyone cares, Romenstein made 313k last year, up from 265 the previous year, acc to the Woodruff Art Center’s form 990.

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ASO Patron

August 16th, 2012
7:40 am

@wrecker. Verizon barely produces a profit thanks to bad management. I own a business and I know luxury is cut during a recession. However, the average cost of a symphony ticket is $35. The Fox sells Broadway shows like crazy but the ASO can’t sell 2000 seats for a concert. This is a marketing problem. In a metropolitan area of 4 plus million people, there are enough people that can afford a ticket to see live music.

While I am not a fan of unions, the musicians are being asked to reduce their salaries to that of a local school teacher. Every one in the Atlanta Symphony are top grads from the most prestigious conservatories. It is insulting to ask them to take school teacher salaries when the problems exist in the administrative parts of the Atlanta Symphony.

A few years ago, there was an obituary in the AJC regarding a V President for Coca Cola. In the obituary, the article read that he was responsible for the multimillion dollar annual support of the Lincoln Center Jazz Festival by Coca Cola. Coke gives millions to NYC arts each year but gives a few hundred thousand to the Atlanta Symphony every year. Delta is an official sponsor of the Atlanta Symphony but charges to fly the Atlanta Symphony (minimal donations there). Home Depot has never given any money to the Atlanta Symphony (even though Arthur Blank has been quite generous). Look at corporate support in other same size cities (Dallas, Pittsburgh, Houston, Minneapolis). Totally different than Atlanta. The Arts enrich their employees and the cities in which they based their corporations. Same on them.

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ASO Fan

August 16th, 2012
8:19 am

@wrecker in regards to cutting the salaries of low-level support positions, the musicians “specifically ask the senior staff members to share in this reduction from their individual salaries so as to avoid placing undue burden on junior and part-time staffers.” You can see their full press release at: http://www.atlsymphonymusicians.com/1/post/2012/08/atlanta-symphony-musicians-offer-28-million.html

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pk

August 16th, 2012
8:25 am

yawn…sounds like a bunch of spoiled and overpaid brats. Get rid of them, I don’t know of a single persont that would miss them if they were disbanded.

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@ASO Patron

August 16th, 2012
8:28 am

You are an ass.

You say ” It is insulting to ask them to take school teacher salaries” as if somebody blowing into a horn were more important than those responsible for the education of our children. Perhaps the reason this organization isn’t financially self-sustainable is due to the haughty attitude of its members and apparently, it’s fans.

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Jeff

August 16th, 2012
8:40 am

Not sure what thier salaries are, but i can say they are FANTASTIC musicians, and doing what they love for a living. How many people can say that?

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GR

August 16th, 2012
8:48 am

@Wrecker  You are wrong on several points. Some ASO musicians have
already left because of the situation here and others will follow if
the ASO management’s proposed pay cuts take place.  Despite the
recession other US cities have symphony management that finds ways to
market and raise money.
The ASO musicians are not currently overpaid by any stretch of the
imagination.  Their compensation ranks 14th out of 18th for fulltime
US orchestras.
The musicians are not calling for any pay cuts for the lower paid
staff members.  They are just asking senior management to take pay
cuts.  Why?  Because the musicians have already agreed to sacrifices
that include 2.8 million dollars in compensation cut.  This includes a
reduction in their salary, the orchestra size, the number of weeks
they are paid, and paying more for their health benefits.
With the 2.8 million that the musicians are willing to give up, senior
management could solve the current deficit gap with pay cuts of their
own.
Finally, the musicians have never mentioned the word strike.  It is
management that said that they will lock them out and cut off their
pay and health care benefits when the current contract expires.  That
is not a strike by workers.  It is a lockout by management.
The Verizon boondoggle is another management fiasco.  We will have to
address that money hole another day.

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reality check

August 16th, 2012
9:28 am

I take issue with some of the things ASO Patron says and agree strongly with others.

First, ASO musicians make more than twice what beginning school teachers make. School teacher salaries used to increase slowly but they no longer do. There are very few teachers who make whar ASO musicians make.

I agree with ASO Patron the support from the corporate community is very tepid to horrible. Perhaps that is because they have little faith in management, but I don’t know that. I do know the musical competence of ASO is very good even when compared with other top symphonies in this country.

However, symphony hall is an embaressment. It looks sterile and more important (to me) the acoustics are horrible. Without a major donor coming forward we are stuck with a product that has excellent musicians in an inadequate venue. That hurts marketing.

The other thing that hurts marketing is the music selection. Every concert will have some pieces that the audience really likes, but we also have to suffer through some things that a lot of people do not enjoy in the name of musical diversity and education. I understand there are matters of personal taste involved, but the ASO knows they could perform things that appeal more.

Retired old Atlantan is right that there are a lot of Atlantans who don’t patronize ASO. If he or she is one of them he or she has the right not to attend, but I don’t care about his/her opinion. The patrons are the ones whose voices need to be respected.

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Sultanof Smyrna

August 16th, 2012
9:45 am

“The reality is that 99% of Atlantans don’t really care whether the ASO is disbanded.”

This is a false statement. 99.99% of Atlantans that don’t care would be more accurate. Starting salery of almost $90K for blowing a horn; man I really chose the wrong profession.

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SultanofSmyrna

August 16th, 2012
9:48 am

Management projets $20 million accumulated debt by the end of fiscal 2013 and has said it is rapidly reaching its borrowing limit

Time to stop the bleeding and let this outdated form of entertainment go the way of the dinosaur

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john rofrano

August 16th, 2012
9:50 am

racially diversified issues? yes, the ASO has its share of orientals but i’ve not noted other minority musicians to any degree. a bit of hypocrisy? perhaps.

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LRM216

August 16th, 2012
10:03 am

Ever since reading how the ASO will not allow Lassiter or Walton High Schools’ chorus to sing with them due to lack of “diversity” of the chorus members, I tend to agree with Retired Old Atlanta. I will never support them or attend an ASO concert again.

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Tim

August 16th, 2012
10:27 am

Pretty soon they will be asking them to play for free like all the other clubs in Atlanta ask their bands. Funny how the bands bring in the patrons that drink & eat but most clubs don’t want to pay. If you have had the same experience, post your comment on our wall. LONG LIVE LIVE MUSIC !!!
http://www.facebook.com/notquitedevils

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just sayin

August 16th, 2012
10:41 am

i always thought it was a stroke of genious to bring in schools to perform with ASO that would pack the house. The tickets cost $35 each and these schools sold out every show. Now bring in schools just to be more diverse that may not have the disposable income to afford the tickets. No wonder the symphony is hurting for money. Looks like they are also hurting for competent management. Lassiter is building its own new theater as we speak I think that will be a great place to have a Christmas show and you won’t have to endure the tired old ASO.

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TommyB

August 16th, 2012
10:53 am

Sultanof Smyrna, this is all a bit much. There are respectful and reasonable ways to get your point across- and then there’s your method.

For someone who has made it clear you don’t care, you seem to have vested quite an interest here in ‘casting stones’, and yet as I read your posts I don’t see to much of you trying to understand a situation.

Clearly you don’t agree with the ASO, or classical music- it may not be your thing. That’s ok. Maybe, if you feel like spending time here checking it all out, you could try it a different way. Try to look at it from the point of view of a group of people within a company trying to keep their company afloat and viable by working with management. Regardless of the reason the company exists, it has to do with people trying to work with their management to help people who DO care about why the company is there- a bunch of employed people in the USA trying to stay that way, and get a good situation going on. There are a lot of people that DO care, even if you are not one of them.

The difference between your approach and the actual POINT of this article is that the ASO musicians are trying to seek support by letting their cause be known, and it would seem that you are merely trying to attack something you don’t care about. One of these actions shows purpose, and the other shows a distinct lack thereof.

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bc

August 16th, 2012
11:09 am

ASO=Dodo Bird

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Lori

August 16th, 2012
11:50 am

Atlanta needs its symphony and the musicians are doing their part in this dispute. We need to back them fully.

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flare

August 16th, 2012
12:12 pm

LOL. I love how there are people who are writing thoughtful support of the ASO on one side and then people writing “I could blow a horn and get paid a lot of money derp derp” and “ASOhurr hurr=dodo bird HURR HURRR” on the other

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David Wetherill

August 16th, 2012
12:15 pm

This is the orchestra Allison Vulgamore left in such “great shape” that the Philadelphia Orchestra hired her. They went bankrupt.
If you want your city to be just a collection of empty office buildings, let the museums and the symphony close their doors.
The arts are for the one or two percent who care. They need to step up and support the arts. Ticket sales never pay for the costs of art. When there is a Picasso tour, the art is worth billions. You get to see it for a few dollars.
Every musician in a professional orchestra is better trained and more skilled than you or anyone you know. If you think this is an easy way to make a living, pick up an instrument and try it yourself.
Boards should give money and raise money. Stop hiring people to do this; it is your job. Bloated managements are the biggest change in costs. And half a million for an executive director of a non-profit is obscene. Put a musician in that job. The MBA’s have failed everywhere.

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GeorgiaPeach

August 16th, 2012
12:24 pm

When I think of all the great cities in this country – New York, Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia, Los Angeles – one of the things they all have in common is great arts. If you have ever gone to the High Museum or the Fox Theater or Phillips Arena for any kind of performance, you are a supporter of the arts. Even if you are not a great supporter of classical music like I am, I hope we can all agree that we want to keep Atlanta on the list of one of those great cities. Support the musicians of the Atlanta Symphony in maintaining the quality of our great orchestra.

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PJ

August 16th, 2012
12:51 pm

If people want to go hear the ASO they will. If they don’t they won’t. The process will play out just like that of any other business. If the ASO does not produce a product able to sustain itself (regardless of how good it may be) then they should be allowed to fail. There is plenty of blame to go around, but the end result is the same. Live classical music is on life support and the cost of running an organization like the ASO is huge. For every person that swears allegiance to the ASO there are probably 100,000 that don’t care a bit. The orchestra appeals largely to a demographic that has no interest in venturing into downtown Atlanta. The ASO is another victim of the apathy that seems to typify this city.

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HKHB

August 16th, 2012
1:06 pm

How many weeks of PAID vacation do most working Americans get? Let’s start with that component of the negotiations.

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Karen Ferren

August 16th, 2012
1:21 pm

What a tragedy for a great city like Atlanta to be in a nasty public battle over the future of their symphony, which is one of the finest in this land, ranking in the upper tier of major orchestras. I find it also disgusting that this organization does not receive any public funding. Most states, counties, and cities give to the arts organizations within their jurisdiction. While some may criticize doing this, it is a proven fact that each of those entities receive 6 to 7 times back what they spend on their arts organizations, thus making it obvious that contributing to the arts is a win, win situation. Likewise, businesses increase their profits every time there is a concert or event. Take note: manager and conductor make many times what the musicians make, and are they volunteering to take cuts? No. Sacrifices should be shared. Wake up board, management, politicians before you lose this treasure or cut back to where it no longer is a worthy showcase for a thriving city.

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Who Cares

August 16th, 2012
1:46 pm

Predicted Headline in the near future: “Atlanta Symphony Orchestra closes doors after last performance”. Reaction from 99.99% of all Atlantans – Yawn

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ASO Fundraiser Plan

August 16th, 2012
1:52 pm

The horn blowers can always set up in a Marta station and let folks throw dollar bills into the instrument case as they walk by. Just make sure that you don’t take the spot where the guy who plays the 5-gallon plastic buckets as drums normally sets up.

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Steve

August 16th, 2012
2:44 pm

ASO management should accept the agreement. And senior management in particular should lead from the front by also making salary sacrifices. Unless of course they’re just rorting the system from the top.

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Taxi Smith

August 16th, 2012
2:45 pm

The patrons of the ASO should support it through ticket revenue. Raise your prices to meet your expenses. 1 + 1 still equals 2.

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Doug of the North

August 16th, 2012
3:18 pm

Let’s see – 90k to blow my horn, or 20 million to play a kid’s game on the Braves. I guess I was in the wrong profession all these years!

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Concerned in the Burbs

August 16th, 2012
3:22 pm

A high salary for those in charge while the operation goes in the tank is unconscionable. The ASO management has lived off its corporate credit to the point that it is hard to pay the interest on its debt, much less the principal. It is operating like the federal government only the ASO cannot print money.

The “Great Recession” has damaged all sectors of the economy and if any business of any kind is to survive it is going to have to save itself. Saving the orchestra (meaning primarily the musicians) is the first priority. The first order of business is to get operating costs under control which means shared sacrifice. The musicians have put a fair proposal on the table; let management do the same from their side. I would be a lot more willing to pay $35 to watch and listen to the musicians than I would to watch ASO management run the organization into the ground. If the Verizon amphitheater needs to be jettisoned to right the ship, so be it. The ASO will survive without a “summer home”. Capital facilities improvements are not going to be supported by corporate sponsors when the operating costs are underwater.

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Liz

August 16th, 2012
3:41 pm

From a human side, symphony players are individuals who have spent their whole lives working at their craft and are simply trying to support themselves and their families and loved ones in the skill they have perfected since they were young. Sure, there are people who don’t care about classical music and that’s fine. But that does not negate the fact that these are people who work hard at what they do, care about their product and always strive to make it better. It doesn’t negate the fact that these workers have homes and children, with lifelong community ties and volunteer efforts that they have been a part of. It is easy for some people to be judgmental and condemn many people for the salaries they make. But mostly people who succeed in every occupation work really hard for it. Who can say that these working people make too much for the hours they have put in their ENTIRE life to be at this level, even if you think it is antiquated and not necessary. Again, these are people who are just trying to support their families in the profession in which they were trained, whether some people think it is a valid profession or not. Again, on the human side, it is sad to wish ANYBODY out of a job, especially in these times.

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Joke of the Day

August 16th, 2012
4:20 pm

What do the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and the band from the Titanic have in common?

Both continued to play as the ship sank

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[...] “We have offered to reduce the size of the orchestra, reduce the individual compensation of musicians, reduce the number of work weeks, and share health care costs with. Our comprehensive solution calls for the staff to share the reduction with us in the coming seasons to help stabilize the future of this great orchestra,” cellist and ASOPA President Daniel Laufer said in a statement posted on Access Atlanta. [...]

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[...] “We have offered to reduce the size of the orchestra, reduce the individual compensation of musicians, reduce the number of work weeks, and share health care costs with. Our comprehensive solution calls for the staff to share the reduction with us in the coming seasons to help stabilize the future of this great orchestra,” cellist and ASOPA President Daniel Laufer said in a statement posted on Access Atlanta. [...]

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[...] “We have offered to reduce the size of the orchestra, reduce the individual compensation of musicians, reduce the number of work weeks, and share health care costs with. Our comprehensive solution calls for the staff to share the reduction with us in the coming seasons to help stabilize the future of this great orchestra,” cellist and ASOPA President Daniel Laufer said in a statement posted on Access Atlanta. [...]

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jim121256

August 16th, 2012
6:26 pm

Several people have made comments like “Starting salery [sic] of almost $90K for blowing a horn.” Let’s look at this a minute. There are 18 full-time professional orchestras in the country (according to one writer; I’m pretty sure that figure’s close if not 100% accurate). In each of those orchestras, there are 3 or 4 trumpet players. That means 54 – 72 jobs nationally. How many guards do you suppose there are in the NBA? Pro athletes are generally done long before the age of 40. Many professional orchestra musicians play well into their 60’s with little or no diminution of skill. There are fewer jobs and the people in those jobs tend to stay in them much longer than pro athletes, yet people complain about the salaries of the musicians in ASO. I haven’t heard you complain about the salaries of the Hawks, Falcons, or Braves. Hmm… ASO has how many grammies? The Three pro sports franchises have how many championships? I don’t understand the level of vitriol directed toward the musicians by some of the commentators. If you don’t think an orchestra is important, or if you can’t understand what they’re doing, you don’t have to go to the concerts.

I agree that marketing is probably a big part of the issue here. I would also observe that it takes an unbelievable level of something… I’m not sure quite what… to offend two of the top high school music programs not just in the local area, but in the nation, at a time when your money problems are this large. I would agree with the person who mentioned that the Lassiter and Walton choruses would tend to fill the hall every time. If I was planning for ASO, I’d be asking them to come sing with us more often.

As a musician, (not at their level, but good enough to make some money “blowing my horn”) I appreciate am in awe of what the ASO players do. This is really one of the world’s great musical organizations. I truly hope they’re able to get their labor, management, and financial problems solved and move onward and upward.

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Tom Bop

August 16th, 2012
8:06 pm

Having a great symphony is a mark of a great city- even if many don’t appreciate it or attend. Our musicians have constantly been praised and awarded as a great ensemble. They’ve spent their lives learning their craft and achieving greatness in their field. Here in Atlanta, the group that doesn’t seem to do its job is the administration- if they can’t make all the pieces work and support the great musicians, they should step aside and allow room for those who can. We need to let some fresh air in who can promote the orchestra outside of the WAC clique, raise funds from all the “newer” corporate citizens of the area, and reach all the potential audiences, instead of their aunts in Buckhead. Finding “darlings” like Spanos (whose concerts I avoid) and paying him $500K for TEN weeks work, paying so many other six-figure salaries to admin, and then saying they can’t afford to pay musicians at a top level is crazy! As someone else said above, no one will ever buy a ticket to see anyone administrate!!

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ASO MUSICIANS supporter

August 16th, 2012
9:07 pm

well said, Tom Bop

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rumman

August 17th, 2012
2:27 am

[...] 8/15/2012 edition of the Atlanta Journal Constitution published an article by Howard Pousner that reports on the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra (ASO) labor negotiations. Of [...]

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[...] Read Atlanta Symphony Musicians Ask Administration to Share in Salary Cuts (Atlanta Journal Constitution) [...]

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PJ

August 17th, 2012
8:32 am

Agree with Tom Bop. Spano is overpaid and is not the man to draw an audience. His programming is often bizarre and out of the mainstream. And while it is commendable that he works to promote lesser-known composers, he seems to be doing it to the detriment of ticket sales. Someone mentioned all the Grammy awards garnered by the orchestra. I dare say that the chorus is far more responsible for that string of success than the orchestra. Count how many non-vocal recordings of the standard repertoire are in that award total. Not many. The awards are primarily for choral works or works of some trendy composer du jour that make the elitists feel good about their vote. It also helped that they had Telarc making most of their winning recordings, as evidenced by the fact several of the awards were for engineering merits, not musical ones. As a musician who has attended many ASO concert over the past 20 or so years, I routinely find their performances pedestrian and dull. Are they played well? Yes. Is there great technical precision? Yes. Are there some world-class musicians in the orchestra? Definitely. Are the performances musically engaging and thrilling? Rarely – especially when Spano is on the podium. Most of the more enthralling performances I have heard have been led by guest conductors. Speaking of which, why doesn’t the ASO attract the big-name guest conductors? Most of those on their guest roster are journeymen or potential up and comers. Where is Haitink or Abbado or Maazel of von Dohnanyi or Eschenbach or Masur or Jarvi or Salonen? This is still not a bona fide big league orchestra or operation. The orchestra apparently believes its own hype, but apparently few others do. Hence the financial woes.

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Russell D'Arensbourg

August 17th, 2012
10:29 am

I hate to hear that that they want to decrease the size of the orchestra.who is to say which instrument is not necessary? Why not decrease the size of the military? Do those sports teams really need all those extra players? It is shameful that a city the size of Atlanta can’t support it’s orchestra. Maybe a couple of pennies on every plane that goes through the airport…

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JS

August 17th, 2012
11:30 am

The only musical I might actually want to go to!

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Hot Sauce

August 17th, 2012
11:42 am

Zebulon

August 17th, 2012
11:52 am

According to ASO management, musician’s compensation share is 28% percent of ASO’s budget. Assuming the best case scenario that 28% is just a share ASO regular musicians and subs you see working every concert night (and does not include Mr. Spano’s $500K comp and highly-paid guest soloists and conductors who are unlikely to participate in cuts), and that musicians are somehow equally culpable in the deficit, then musicians would have to cheap in 28% of $5M yearly deficit, which comes down to $1.4M a year, right? Musicians are very close to that in their offer! Still management won’t budge?

Now does anyone believe that musicians are actually responsible for deficit creation? Was it their decision to build Verizon stage, to renovate the lobby and take on extremely expensive productions that play 2-3 times? Musicians have no say in that at all. But again, despite not having to do anything with that, musicians take the public, verifiable cut alright, and all management does is putting out an unsubstantiated claim that suits have already paid their share?

Dear ASO management and WAC board, how is that I see billboards of High Museum everywhere across the city, as well as High ads on the New York Times web site, but no advertisement of the ASO? Your marketing of ASO is abysmal, but still judging the quality of suits managers wear, they are pulling 6 figures easily. How in the world would you make us believe you are even marginally competent if ASO ads are not even present in the Hartsfield International?

Mr. Spano, where are you in all this? Your legacy with ASO and Atlanta is exactly what? Do you want your decade-long tenure in Atlanta impact to be just like of a very highly-paid wedding band or you want to be remembered by Atlanta for something bigger than avoiding standing for anything?

Dear WAC board, you are probably right in counting that 99% of Atlantans won’t notice if something bad happens to ASO. But then your legacy will be turning Atlanta from the world-class city into a backwater where those who never even heard about ASO will still be worse off without it, because those who would care about classical music will choose some more vibrant place to live.

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Nina

August 17th, 2012
12:06 pm

Screw you guys, I’m going home.

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Nunya Bidness

August 17th, 2012
12:25 pm

Mooom, if you were in a German Scheisse video, you’d tell me, right?

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Wreck

August 17th, 2012
12:31 pm

I’m a Mormon and can’t wait to see it. Parker and Stone are the only ones who can manage to complete ridicule something while still respecting it, it’s amazing…and funny as hell

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Jim4567

August 17th, 2012
4:04 pm

It’s not either sides fault. Really good people making a difference in lives of others. Blame it on Obama’s bum economy and hope for a change to get it restarted.

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Retired Old Atlantan

August 18th, 2012
12:25 pm

I loved the comment by the Cobb County mother that the “ASO has just lost my business.” My guess would be that she has never been to the ASO. I, of course, could be wrong, but it seems unlikely since I doubt that hardly any Cobb County residents venture inside the dreaded city limits of Atlanta to attend the ASO.

BO, why don’t you try to contact that lady and ask when the last time she went to the ASO was.

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Diane Palmer

August 18th, 2012
4:55 pm

The ASO is a world-class symphonic orchestra. It is an invaluable asset to our city and region. Clearly, compensating the musicians is central to the outstanding quality of performances! This organization provides a cultural and economic boon to Atlanta and increases the quality of music and the arts all across the metro area and beyond. Please do what it takes to keep our orchestra strong.

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Cobb County Resident

August 18th, 2012
11:41 pm

Lots of Cobb County residents go to the ASO. I know of one, but he went before he moved out here to Cobb County.

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End waste

August 19th, 2012
12:08 am

The truth is if you are good enough people will pay, Jackie Evancho is only 12 years old and she sings clascial music with full orchestras and every body gets payed without any government support. Why should these people expect it.

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Glynn Finley

August 19th, 2012
6:25 am

http://www.atlsymphonymusicians.com/1/post/2012/08/atlanta-symphony-musicians-offer-to-perform-for-free-with-choral-groups.html

Atlanta patrons need to read this article in able to validate that the musicians of the Atlanta Symphony are the ones willing to compensate for the sub-standard performance of management of the Atlanta Symphony. Upper management seems to be unwilling to accept the responsibility of the mis-management that the musicians are willing to compensate for upper management’s positions of employment possible. If it were not for the musicians, the musical and cultural opportunities available for the patrons of Atlanta would not exist. These musicians have demonstrated their personal/professional commitment to the “Fine Arts” and commitment to the city of Atlanta by their training (from early childhood). The only personal/professional commitment management has contributed is their completion of a degree in business management which seems to be failing the musicians as well as the city of Atlanta, its patrons and the benefactors it is responsible to serve. Musicians are sensitive and appreciative enough to contribute to the arts within any community they serve. In this case, it seems upper management is un-willing to make the equivalent/personal/financial contractual sacrifices while demonizing the musicians who continually contribute freely beyond contractual requirements for the advancement of “Fine Arts” and cultural opportunities essential for the City of Atlanta.

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Barry

August 21st, 2012
1:50 pm

Saw in NY thanks to my lovely wife. Will see it again when it comes to the ATL!!

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JuneBug

August 21st, 2012
1:55 pm

“My comment was taken out of context,” said Romanstein, “and I’m not very happy about that.”

UH NO…too late Sasquatch. You said it now deal with it.

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Andrew Bate

August 21st, 2012
3:43 pm

The Atlanta Symphony’s members are as accomplished as the world’s finest athletes. They are just as talented and contribute (at least) equally to the community as the Braves and Falcons. These skilled artists and athletes help to create the vibrant culture that make Atlanta great (and arguably a better place to live and move a business than major cities in surrounding states).

Sure, not everyone likes to attend the symphony, a Braves or a Hawks game but by giving the world’s most talented a venue to contribute to our community benefits us all.

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Dr. Cynthia Morrow-Hattal

August 21st, 2012
9:24 pm

Reading these comments makes me glad that I live in Seattle. We love the arts here and support them rigorously, but we are the most literate city in America as well, so it makes sense. I’ve flown down to hear the Atlanta Symphony many times, especially when Cecylia Arzewski was concertmaster. It’s a first rate orchestra. The average ASO musician has far more training than your average neurosurgeon, so to compare their salary with that of a beginning school teacher is absurd. They are musical Olympians. To the wise guy who suggested that they make a high salary for “blowing a horn”, may I suggest that he try it. Classical music is a profession, an art, and is one of the greatest accomplishments of civilized man, aural mathematics and an emotional representation of our evolution. Oh, wait, do you people even believe in evolution?.

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markie mark

August 26th, 2012
3:05 pm

When this stupid organization, which is in dire financial need, discards that ludicrous policy of denying high school/college singing groups that are not diverse enough, then my wife and I will attend concerts again. Until then, I wont spend a dime on ASO or anything that ASO presents in the way of other entertainment. Obviously, their directors will not allow groups that are too “caucasian”. They appear to have no issue with groups that are overwhelmingly African American.

When this policy is reversed, and they invite groups based solely on ability with no consideration towards race whatsoever, then they may find that people will offer more financial assistance.

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Wow

August 26th, 2012
3:18 pm

This society is going down the toliet!! This is the third AJC blog I’ve read today where some yahoo is mentioning race. I mean come on really?? This is a article about a collective bargaining agreement. I guess ignorance and intolerance goes beyond the sports and news sections.

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Mark

August 26th, 2012
5:02 pm

WOW… I’m not sure when recognizing intolerance became ignorant, however the crux of the ASO’s biscuit is $$$ and their lack of it. The simple facts about performance diversity requirements are the ASO’s issue at a time when I’m sure they already have revenue issues. STUPID ASO!!!

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Blake

August 26th, 2012
8:34 pm

Wow is right! Everything in this hick town is about race. You don’t think the failure to pass T-SPLOST wasn’t about suburban whites keeping urban blacks out of their neighborhoods? Can you spell Tea Party? Let me guess where this yahoo who “won’t spend a dime on the ASO” lives. Cherokee or Cobb, perhaps? The State of Georgia contributes next to NOTHING for the arts (or mass transportation), and yet urban Atlanta is the single largest economic driver in the region. An internationally recognized symphony drives huge economic value into the region, yet the same, shrill, “outside the Perimeter” voices get their say over and over about how money is allocated to Atlanta and it’s struggling arts community. It’s no wonder the “Red States of America” fail by almost every metric. Hey, Mark…stay out in the suburbs! Us “Caucasians” that pay city taxes will take care of the bill!

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FM Fats

August 27th, 2012
1:01 pm

I’d like to be there when the Folk Art Conference people meet Mr. I at the Archer Gallery.

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Al Stilo

September 11th, 2012
12:33 pm

Full disclosure, I am the marketing director at Aurora Theatre, but I thought it was important to mention that Clyde ‘n Bonnie: A Folktale led all shows with 15 nominations. Included in those nominees are Broadway veterans, Lonnie Price, Hunter Foster, Rick Chrom and Josh Rhodes who all came to Atlanta to develop this astounding World Premiere Musical.

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John Calder

September 12th, 2012
1:54 pm

Congratulations to all of the nominees and the organizations that were so prolific this past season.
I was originally from Atlanta and started in the high school, college and community theatres of Atlanta.
My only question is why THEATER OF THE STARS which for 60 years has presented shows in Atlanta and continues to present productions and to hire Atlanta actors when possible is not included in this recognition of the arts community?

Just wondering.

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Paul Holly

September 12th, 2012
3:11 pm

Mr. Calder, THEATER OF THE STARS has come under our umbrella as a participating theatre company beginning with the 2012-2013 season for their self produced productions. We do not consider touring shows. The Suzi nominations above are for productions during last season – August 1, 2011 to July 31, 2012.

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Deadra Moore

September 12th, 2012
9:42 pm

In addition, THEATER OF THE STARS generally has a very short run, albeit in a large house (the Fox). The nature of our process means that our panel judges have a hard time scheduling when a run is less than 12 performances, or about two – three weeks. We’re working with THEATER OF THE STARS this season to make it possible for the judges to see their wonderful work. For more information on the Suzi Awards processes and our non-profit organization, check out the website at http://www.suziawards.org.

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Sinae

September 16th, 2012
4:57 pm

Wow…..Must have been a rough year. Not a single Black Actor (male) nominated for an outstanding Actor award in any category………yikes. Wait, except for Mississipi Charles who probably doesn’t give two craps about a Suzi. And then I love how out of the 4 Black Actresses nominated for an Outstanding Actress award, 3 of them are nominated in the same category WITH Bethany who is nominated for 2 awards…..lol This list always reminds me why I left ATL and encourages me to never come back…..
This is simply an observation. i really don’t need a response from a Suzi Executive or Board Member explaining fairness and other crap. Believe me, I get it.

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charles

October 23rd, 2012
9:44 am

It is amazing how we seem to “stand tall on the shoulders of others”! May we as we age and progress, have the same said of ourselves someday.

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ozzfest

October 23rd, 2012
10:30 am

I am a native and a High Member…and have never heard his name.
Odd.

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Tag

October 23rd, 2012
10:34 am

A very good man.

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Woodrow

October 23rd, 2012
10:35 am

What an amazing legacy.

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JMT

October 23rd, 2012
11:53 am

Remember him taking time to talk to a group of 5th graders on a field trip over 20yrs ago. I know b/c I was one of them. Great man.

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Scott

October 23rd, 2012
2:21 pm

A good man. He will be missed by all who knew him. My prayers are with his family at this time.

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Jack Miller

October 24th, 2012
11:21 pm

Gudmund Vigtel was a marvelous person, and
a great Director of the High Museum. The seven years I worked for him there were always rewarding and a genuine pleasure.

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No sure

October 30th, 2012
3:47 pm

I am not so sure these guys are innocent. Not to say that the case was handled fairly AT ALL. I give them that. However, I just can’t sit and say that just because it wasn’t handled fairly, they are innocent. I have watched each and every documentary on this case and to me, something isn’t right, especially with Damien.

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icon set

November 4th, 2012
10:15 am

Best bets: Nov. 6-12 | Best Of The Big A

November 5th, 2012
5:36 pm

[...] TUESDAY Visual art: From 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Nov. 6, the High Museum of Art will offer “pay-as-you-wish” admission. With many metro schools closed for polling, the High is encouraging folks to spend part of the day getting cultured (after voting, of course). For more info, check out this post on the Arts & Culture blog. [...]

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Joe Fish

November 12th, 2012
4:22 pm

Escamillo’s name is Aleksey Bogdanov, not Bogdonav, and he was just great! The whole cast was top-notch, the direction was complex and effective, and the orchestra and chorus sounded terrific!

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Jamila Robinson

November 12th, 2012
5:13 pm

Thanks Joe. I agree, just a top-notch staging. Beautiful singing.

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Mike

November 16th, 2012
12:32 pm

Thanks for this – I appreciate it.

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GR

November 19th, 2012
1:44 pm

any new reviews on Carmen’s last shows, friday or sunday?

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John

November 20th, 2012
4:49 pm

Thanks for the post – I love the Sheryl Crow song… now I just have to wait till March :)

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PM

December 9th, 2012
10:23 pm

Three circus at the same time? Not that Atlanta ever lacked for manure, here’s more. Politicians take note -and snag some free tickets or incentives or “gifts” or whatever elected officials call it.

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[...] Culture notes: Michelle Williams to star in ‘Fela’ in Atlanta [...]

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[...] release date is announced, I will give you all an update. Meanwhile, the film will be closing the Atlanta Film Festival on March 23. This entry was posted on February 21st, 2013 and and is filed under Movies, News and [...]

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twjsinger

March 6th, 2013
12:52 am

I’m wondering if this article was proofed before it was published. If so, then I feel very embarrassed for the future of printed media in Atlanta and especially the AJC. I think a 5th grader could have written a better review.

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Jack

March 7th, 2013
4:27 pm

Is this a joke? Are you hiring the intro to music students to write this garbage? Just give up.

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Chantrell Cofielf

March 7th, 2013
9:17 pm

My daughter would love to be a part of this program.

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Ed Itor

March 18th, 2013
6:15 am

Toby Kamps, chief curator of Houson’s Menil Collection; missing a t.

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CCC

April 24th, 2013
1:20 pm

I really wish when things moved out of Atlanta they would quit calling themselves “The Atlanta…” I know other cities have actually taken groups to court over the use of the city’s names when it doesn’t really apply.

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LC

June 25th, 2013
12:01 pm

Great News. I look forward to checking out the lineup…especially “Spunk”. Thanks to Kenny for remembering those of us in ATL that love great theater. He could have focused all his time and energy on projects in NY projects instead. So glad he did not:)

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arlene

June 25th, 2013
4:33 pm

I saw “Race” in New York several years ago with David Alan Grier, Kerry Washington, James Spader,and Richard Thomas(John-boy.) Fast moving, and very dramatic.Can’t wait to see the Atlanta production.

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Doug Reiser

June 25th, 2013
9:33 pm

I am excited about the lineup for True Colors! I look forward to seeing your Atlanta Productions of some excellent plays!!

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Jackie

June 28th, 2013
3:54 pm

Love the story Same Time Next Year and love Phylicia Rashad. Looking forward to this production!

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roger d, lauzon

June 29th, 2013
12:49 pm

what a great concept

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Mick Dee

June 29th, 2013
4:40 pm

6 planes, an old hangar, and a minimalist webpage. Here’s what it really is: jobs and contracts for friends of the board and a way to hold extremely valuable real estate at the airport without any hassle from shareholders to sell it.

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Jack ®

June 30th, 2013
6:06 am

Pray tell, Mick Dee: what would you want it to be?

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bob

June 30th, 2013
7:08 pm

Yes Mick Dee……Please tell us…..we are all waiting your answer.

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BILLY MAYS HERE

June 30th, 2013
9:04 pm

Too bad Delta put it inside their campus. It’s very inaccessible and generally a hassle to get to.

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[...] get overhaul A $6.3 million renovation will be funded by the Delta Air Lines Foundation. Source: Atlanta Journal-Constitution Share [...]

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Anton Chigurh

July 1st, 2013
12:48 pm

Didn’t even know they had one. Now I want to go to it. Hope there is an exhibit on the finger wagging redhead in their recent flight safety videos. Gorgeous and funny.

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[...] get overhaul A $6.3 million renovation will be funded by the Delta Air Lines Foundation. Source: Atlanta Journal-Constitution Share [...]

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Andy

August 1st, 2013
3:18 pm

How could TOTS compete with Broadway in Atlanta which is bringing a great line up that includes Book of Mormon, Lion King, Evita and other shows?

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Candice

August 1st, 2013
4:42 pm

What you can;t go to more shows than the ones put out by the Fox Theatre? I wanted to see a couple of the shows TOTS was bring to Atlanta. A great show isn’t always the one with the most publicity. Sometimes you find one that speaks to you in the ones that are not so large.

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Jason

August 1st, 2013
5:32 pm

This is very sad. Several theatres in Atlanta are in trouble right now and are living on the edge financially. I hope this isn’t a sign of things to come. It’s difficult for live theatre to compete with more and more home entertainment systems. I would hate for the highest level of culture in Atlanta to end up being the Falcons

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Bee Hive Haired cashier at Dooleys Den

August 1st, 2013
6:48 pm

Just goes to show, no one cares abut live theater.I know I don’t.

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GeorgiaBoyinJersey

August 1st, 2013
10:26 pm

I am not surprised here at all. I started my theatre career at TOTS back in 1974 when they were producing shows at both the Civic Center and the now-demolished Peachtree Playhouse. I think the original executive producers had a vision, but it was a small-town vision, not one that can thrive in the non-artistic, corporate bond-market world we live in now. The major problem is the Manos family….they let this beautiful thing die a slow death. Don’t get me wrong…I appreciate everything that Chris did for me…he even let me live at the warehouse near Chastain Park when I lost the lease to my apartment in 1977…but I now work in NYC and develop new theatre productions and TOTS is a dinosaur.The Board of Directors should have wrestled control away from Chris years ago…maybe as far back as 1990. Companies like NETworks and TheatreWorks have taken over the reins of “Broadway style” productions. They are non-union, which means that they don’t have to compete with the companies that are forced to use AEA or AFM members and pay into their pension programs. The young people in these shows are wonderful and very talented. I saw a TOTS show two years ago and I just left the Fox because it was so bad. Why do they focus on developing shows that won’t work, like “Buddy”? Their overhead is too high…their salaries for executives and support staff don’t justify the quality of the productions. I’ve seen it in Chicago….Dallas…..Cincinnati and now Atlanta. It happened to the Academy Theatre in 1990, the Theatre In The Square in 2009, and now TOTS. Corporate sponsorship, which has been the lifeblood of non-profit theatre for the last 50 years is drying up and theatres today must be more judicious in their operations and creative decision making.

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Clint

August 2nd, 2013
6:11 am

I was a season ticket subscriber for many years back in the 90’s. After enduring year after year of Robert Goulet in Camelot I could not take any more and stopped. I am surprised they lasted this long and it is sad. They actually did occasionally produce some very high quality theater. As a theater lover I do hope they work out their financial woes and come back.

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theatresupporter

August 2nd, 2013
9:19 am

Georgiaboyinjersey…you hit the nail on the head. Square on the head. For the record, Buddy was NOT produced by Theater of the Stars, it was produced by a separate company run by the Manos’ I am told. Let’s just leave it at that, shall we? Theater of the Stars is an institution in Atlanta…YES, but it was run like a mom and pop. How many people knew that it was a non-profit organization? Not many. In order to run a successful business, any business, you must first understand and nurture your clientele and you must also present a top notch product…all of the time. You must also operate your company with integrity and honor. Many of us who are subscribers have been with Theater of the Stars for a very long time, and there are those of us who were very well aware of the ins and outs of the company. It hasn’t all been rosy and it seems as though things just took the big ole slide once Chris’s son took the reins. I am sad beyond measure that this has happened to TOTS, but sometimes you have to look within before you blame a community for not stepping up and trying to save something that for the most part, they didn’t even understand in the first place.

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Diane

August 4th, 2013
3:07 pm

Theseus Productions is the executive producer of The Buddy Holly North American tour #25. This company is run by the Manos’. It is my understanding that they will not turn over Buddy to another executive producer (Gateway) that wants to take the tour over. This risks putting the talented cast and crew out of a job. Why drag them down with TOTS?!

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(the other) Rodney

September 3rd, 2013
6:16 am

4. Sign on back of a wheelchair: “WARNING. If zombies chase us, I’m tripping you.”

ROFL – Rule #1 – Cardio. ;)

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[...] writer also found evidence of a smell: 2. George “Space Ghost” Lowe, scribbling on a glossy photograph in the well-trafficked Walk of [...]

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Revenar

September 3rd, 2013
4:16 pm

The Hilton staff was actually dressed up as the characters from Alice in Wonderland to greet guests checking in on Thursday. They love the event, and go all-out to make it as enjoyable as possible for the guests!

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[...] writer also found evidence of a smell: 2. George “Space Ghost” Lowe, scribbling on a glossy photograph in the well-trafficked Walk of [...]

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GGCB

September 19th, 2013
6:58 am

i thought about participating in the am ex presale…but when i saw the outrageous ticket prices, i decided against it. i realize this show is a ‘hot ticket’, but over $100 for a seat up in the proverbial nosebleeds of the fox? forget it.

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GGCB

September 19th, 2013
6:59 am

one more thing: the fox theatre is charging almost $23 per ticket in fees and surcharges, which makes them no better than ticketmaster….disappointing.

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Bob

September 19th, 2013
10:53 am

If the tickets were free, this show is not worth it. Saw it in NY, wasted good oney on juvenile filth. maybe next year they will come up with “Book of N*****” or “Book of Hebes” and then the literati will tell us how good those are?

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John Simon

October 16th, 2013
6:36 pm

Thanks for the opportunity to listen to ASO.

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Patricia Poindexter

October 18th, 2013
1:57 pm

Enter your comments here

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Picasso

October 30th, 2013
11:12 pm

When did funding the arts become the job of government? If art was so important it would find ways to fund itself–correct. Sounds like another liberal entitlement scheme to me.

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BPJ

November 1st, 2013
11:06 am

Markets are wonderful things, but markets by themselves do not provide everything necessary for a good life or a great city. The states we compete with understand the importance of the arts and fund them accordingly, which is why Georgia ranks last per capita in arts support. Let’s catch up with our neighbors such as North Carolina and Tennessee.

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BG

November 2nd, 2013
7:14 am

The arts are an important policy asset and prosperity generator for states. In addition to their inherent value to society, the arts offer a distinctive blend of benefits, including:

ECONOMIC DRIVERS: The arts create jobs and produce tax revenue. A strong arts sector is an economic asset that stimulates business activity, attracts tourism revenue, retains a high quality work force and stabilizes property values. The arts have been shown to be a successful and sustainable strategy for revitalizing rural areas, inner cities and populations struggling with poverty.

EDUCATIONAL ASSETS: The arts foster young imaginations and facilitate children’s success in school. They provide the critical thinking, communications and innovation skills essential to a productive 21st-century work force.

CIVIC CATALYSTS: The arts create a welcoming sense of place and a desirable quality of life. The arts also support a strong democracy, engaging citizens in civic discourse, dramatizing important issues and encouraging collective problem solving.

CULTURAL LEGACIES: The arts preserve unique culture and heritage, passing a state’s precious cultural character and traditions along to future generations.

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[...] Atlanta Journal-Constitution, ArtsATL.com, Boston Globe, Yale School of Music, McGill University: [...]

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November 28th, 2013
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Alice Nelson

December 6th, 2013
9:54 pm

I am Whitney’s grandmother, ready to “jump over a barrel” with pride. Whitney and Micah have worked
and studied many long years in their love of art and deserve all the accolades and rewards they are
now receiving. Of course I am proud, but mostly thankful for them.

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RevRick Blondeau

December 6th, 2013
11:10 pm

Your Truely blessed and a little nuts. And to think I got to clean your sinks when we worked together at LCS. now your famous and Sid and I still can’t draw water. I’m berry proud of u.

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Jill Davis -Collins Thompson

December 7th, 2013
4:36 pm

Have known Micah and Whitney for quite a while now and the art here in this piece is no less thoughtful in its tribute to the work of Muybridge and the history of the container holding the former as it is a tribute to Micah and Whitney’s rich personal submission to a Providence-given power to see beyond the ordinary and inspire us all. These two fine young artists were gifted and supported by their parents! Micah has been especially supported by Debi Stansell, who though very creatively gifted herself, has taken great pleasure in cheering and supporting the strengths and special gifts of her whole family!

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Marlene Stansell/Sheffield

December 9th, 2013
3:11 pm

I am so proud of Micah and Whitey and their great art work. They are both so amazing in what they do. The Lord has blessed them in such a great way. They really work hard at everything they do.
Grandmother & Von

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Anita Miller

December 12th, 2013
1:53 pm

HI
I am Whitney’s aunt from Pittsburgh and am also very proud of Micah and Whitney – they always have such incredibly unique vision with their art. I can also add that Whitney’s talent comes directly from the O’Toole side of the family…ha. You guys rock! Aunt Anita

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Jessica Elaine Blinkhorn

January 7th, 2014
7:42 pm

How does one apply? I am a local artist and specialize in drawing. I am working on a new series of drawings and am extremely interested in having my work seen.

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stephen bach

January 8th, 2014
8:19 am

Kudos to the Antinori Foundation and the High. They are smart to fund recognition to the talent that surrounds it in Atlanta. I have always thought art museums should have an eye for the culture of their community as well as the world.

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Howard Pousner

January 9th, 2014
12:07 pm

Here’s the response from the High Museum …
The process is not open to application, as art acquisitions at the High Museum of Art are made at the discretion of the curatorial staff and upon approval of the director and board of trustees. Inquiries and suggestions may be submitted online here:
https://www.high.org/en/Visit/Contact-Us.aspx?Dept=GeneralHighMuseum

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Kevin

January 22nd, 2014
11:26 am

Good for Fulton County! I would slash the arts budget even more! In these hard times, government funding of the “arts” is outrageous and foolish!

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BPJ

January 24th, 2014
9:32 am

People who want the arts budget slashed should go live in Cobb, where there’s plenty of money to subsidize sports arenas. We live in Fulton because we actually desire the benefits of civilization, the arts being first among them.

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1776

February 13th, 2014
9:33 am

One has absolutely nothing to do with the other….rap = cr@p.

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Robbi

February 14th, 2014
2:49 pm

Enter your comments here

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Klancy martin

March 3rd, 2014
9:01 pm

The music was just the icing on the cake. Doug was a great guy in all aspects of life. He will be missed.

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Blake

March 5th, 2014
10:38 pm

I love the line about the breakdown in internal communication, yeah….right…..little KSU egg on the proverbial face? Not a wise owl move. Let’s hope they play better football than they make these type of basic decisions. What’s going on with our tax dollars at this institution? I bet this is a classic case of all the money going to administrators and not to the students, or the teachers in the classroom.

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drew

March 5th, 2014
11:12 pm

Further proof that KSU is not an institution based on education, but just another money making business. Luckily, people can see right thru the charade. What a joke.

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Bernie31

March 5th, 2014
11:33 pm

The Appropriate Place is in the men’s room right above the STinkest URINAL.. Then Flushed on the Day of its Last Showing…uh..huh.

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Michael

March 6th, 2014
12:27 am

Reminds me of other stupid decisions related to kennesaw and the board of regents. Like having them absorb southern polytechnic.

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P Taylor

March 18th, 2014
8:13 am

The professors should have eliminated the word “fully” from the phrase “fully support freedom of expression” in their letter because they don’t. They support expression only so far as it does not offend their own senses. If they “fully” supported freedom of expression, they would have supported the inclusion of the artistic exhibit as a way of furthering debate and discussion. They would prefer that such expression not even exist. “Free speech for me, but not for thee” as one expression goes.

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LBouska

March 18th, 2014
9:57 am

Enter your comments here

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Chris Carlsten

March 20th, 2014
2:33 pm

So very sorry for the loss of this wonderful woman. Theater needs all the friends and support it can get. A terrible loss.
Chris Carlsten
President of the Board Essential Theater

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The Anti-Gnostic

March 21st, 2014
9:28 am

Classical ballet is a dying medium. In an effort to sustain itself at a certain income level, the Atlanta ballet resorts to exchanging skin for dollars. It’s a very old business model.

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Trish Byers

March 28th, 2014
2:35 pm

The Lyric shows are The BEST entertainment value in Atlanta !!

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Diana Tipton

March 31st, 2014
10:08 pm

Atlanta Lyric Theatre is professional community musical theater at its best….thanks to the Lyric, we no longer need to travel to New York to see a quality show.

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Olivia

April 2nd, 2014
7:19 pm

Shout out to Wesleyan School with their record of 8 nominations!

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Brenda

April 3rd, 2014
8:17 am

Tri-Cities congratulations on an awesome performance and 14 nominations!

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Carmen Creamer-Tingle

April 17th, 2014
7:47 pm

I am extremely proud of my son-in-law, Paul S. Benjamin!!!

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